Civil Rights Law Questions

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Virginia on Oct 16, 2012

Mr. Andrew T. Bodoh Esq.'s answer
This depends on why the officers tackled your son. It is important to act promptly in these kind of cases to preserve as much information as possible.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Virginia on Dec 17, 2012

Mr. Andrew T. Bodoh Esq.'s answer
You consider talking to a civil rights attorneys. In Virginia, claims on behalf of prisoners can be difficult and very expensive. Unless there is a blatant legal wrong or a very serious injury, these cases are often cost prohibitive to families.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Virginia on Dec 14, 2010

Mr. Andrew T. Bodoh Esq.'s answer
If the officers had a valid search warrant when they conducted the search, the officers are authorized and in fact required to do anything the warrant describes. Assuming the warrant required them to search the house for evidence of the robbery, they ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Georgia on Sep 4, 2013

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
This is question you need to ask your lawyer. As a general rule, lawyers should give clients updates on major activities. However, don't wait for your attorney to contact you. If you haven't heard from him/her in 2-4 weeks, check in and ask ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Georgia on Jul 20, 2013

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
There isn't a set time for a trial if that's what you are referring to in your question. It may be a year or more or never. In most cases, the defendant files for summary judgment to get the case dismissed. Other cases are settled before trial. ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Jun 16, 2013

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
This will require the hiring of an attorney to help you. You should consult with an attorney in your area. Please take copies of all relevant documents with you. Many attorneys give free conferences for family law matters.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on May 1, 2013

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
If you flick off a cop and curse at him, aren't you asking for trouble? While some can argue freedom of speech, you cannot go around shouting fire in a crowded theater or yelling obscenities at cops.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Dec 7, 2012

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
What new evidence that was not available prior to trial has now become available? This would probably be a very tough case. He can do a number of things to prove innocense, but it basically hinges upon new evidence that was not discovered or discoverable ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Dec 26, 2012

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
Yes a judge has to follow the law when ruling in a case. When the judge does not follow the law, the standard of review is abuse of discretion, and it could be a de novo standard as well, depending upon the circumstances.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Mar 8, 2013

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
I think it is 2 years for torts, personal injury type actions. You need to consult with an attorney who handles police brutality cases.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Jan 31, 2013

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
Contact the American Civil Liberties Union.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Mar 8, 2013

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
For 1st degree felonies the S/L is 4 years, and for 2nd and 3rd degree felonies it is 3 years. It seems to me that the state will not be bringing charges against them, but that you would have to file a civil suit within 2 years of the torts.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Florida on Mar 18, 2013

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
We need to know a lot more than that the 1st DCA conceded your argument on appeal. You should consult with the attorneys who either represented you at the trial or appellate level, or if that was the public defender, an attorney in your area.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Arizona on Feb 24, 2013

Brian Strickman's answer
No, Arizona law permits the DOC to charge prisoners. The laws permit the "room and board" charge and also a charge of up to $2 per month for utilities. Please see ARS 31-254 and ARS 31-239. Other states have similar laws, and at least 1 US ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Arizona on Sep 29, 2012

Brian Strickman's answer
In this type of situation you generally have to demonstrate that the police have violated a statute or constitution. A notice of claim must be filed, with the city that you seek to take action against, within 180 days of the incident, according to ARS ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Arizona on May 12, 2013

Brian Strickman's answer
Is the question is it illegal to disclose protected health information pertaining to illegal drug use, when the healthcare provider has obtained an authorization to disclose mental health? It is difficult to answer this question without knowing more about ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Georgia on Mar 5, 2013

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You need a civil rights lawyer who specializes in prisoner's rights. You should look on this site on Lawyer Directory and Google "civil rights" "prisoners' rights" and Georgia and attorney.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for California on Jan 19, 2013

Malosack Berjis's answer
If you believe that there has been a violation of your civil rights, you should contact a local civil rights attorney.
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Delaware on Aug 1, 2012

Charles Snyderman's answer
I suggest you contact an attorney with a civil practice who represents individuals who are injured.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights Law for Illinois on Dec 26, 2012

Stephen Sotelo's answer
Yes. However, the limitations period varies depending on the type of civil rights violation. Don't wait to find out your rights. ***Stephen Sotelo, The Fish Law Firm, P.C., 55 S. Main St., Suite 341, Naperville, IL 60540 (630)355-7590 ...