Immigration Law Questions

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Apr 24, 2013

Jeanne T Anderson's answer
You must show proof of your legal entry when you appear for your adjustment of status interview. Do you have a stamp in your passport showing legal entry? You should file for replacement I-94 to show proof of legal entry.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Jan 26, 2014

Jeanne T Anderson's answer
Are you trying to bring your spouse's parents to the United States? You may not petition for his (or her) parents. When s/he becomes a U.S. citizen s/he may petition for the parents. You should consult with an attorney for further assistance.
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Oct 13, 2011

Rodney John Alberto's answer
The answer to this depends, partially, on how old you are. If you are over 21 and/or married to someone not a USC, then your avenues are a bit more complicated. I would speak to an immigration attorney. Our firm handles clients all over the world and ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Jul 30, 2011

Francis M. Boyer's answer
No idea as it depends on the type of visa that you have. Some visas can be extended from the U.S., others such as the J-1 may have a 2-year bar, and some must be renew overseas.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Dec 12, 2010

Gus M. Shihab Esq's answer
Dear Sir/Madam, I actually wrote an article about this on my website. You can find it here: http://www.shihabimmigrationfirm.com/lawyer-a ttorney-1555722.html You can work for a "for profit" employer and still be exempt from the numerical cap. ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Dec 6, 2010

Gus M. Shihab Esq's answer
Dear Sir/Madam, If you filed a complaint for Mandamus against the USCIS or if you filed a petition for review, the government normally has 60 days to answer by regulations. The attorneys could request additional time to respond by agreement of the parties ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Virginia on Nov 23, 2010

Gus M. Shihab Esq's answer
Dear Sir, It is not clear from the facts whether your son would be able to apply for US Birth Certificate by virtue of his birth to you, a US Citizen. You state that you have not lived in the US for five years but again you state that you did. So, the ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Georgia on Mar 31, 2013

John S LaRose's answer
Yes, you need to submit all the documentation required for the N400 application, even if it was previously submitted with a different form and application.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Georgia on Jan 1, 2014

John S LaRose's answer
There is nothing preventing him from doing so. You should contact a good immigration attorney to review the facts of your case and determine your best course of action.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Georgia on Feb 19, 2014

John S LaRose's answer
It is impossible to say without more facts. You should consult a good immigration lawyer to review your case and advise you an your best course of action.
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for New Jersey on Jan 22, 2014

Marybeth P Rowen's answer
You have likely heard that crimes can get a green card holder deported and that may be why you are asking this question. The crime you list was most likely a misdeameanor but you will need to check for certainty. Crimes will potentially affect your ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Texas on Mar 3, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
Your question can have multiple answers. He may already be a US Citizen if the following is true: If born abroad to ONE U.S. citizen, if all of the following are true: He is under 18 and never married... • One parent was a U.S. citizen when he was ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Texas on Feb 19, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
That all sounds like potential unauthorized practice of law, which may be a felony criminal offense. You should seek the advice of your Lawyer and not a internet bulletin board.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Jersey on Feb 10, 2014

Guerline Ladouceur-Laurore's answer
There is no Dream Act yet. If you are referring to DACA, I suggest you consult an attorney for a comprehensive evaluation of your case.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Jersey on Feb 16, 2014

Guerline Ladouceur-Laurore's answer
I am really sorry about your father. Were your mother and and eldest single brother included on the petition? Your mother needs a comprehensive evaluation of her case through a paid consultation with an immigration attorney. Good luck.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Pennsylvania on Feb 11, 2013

Guerline Ladouceur-Laurore's answer
This question has been asked more than a year ago, do you still need assistance?
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Pennsylvania on Aug 27, 2013

Guerline Ladouceur-Laurore's answer
You do not seem to have a 10 year bar issue and with the assistance of an experience immigration attorney, you should be able to adjust your status.