Texas Real Estate Law Questions

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Mar 3, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
Generally, No. That is not saying that the contracts among the parties could not make them liable if it was all agreed to. If you are asking if the taxing entity will go after you, they will only go after the property itself if it remains unpaid long ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Oct 17, 2013

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
Yes. Much easier than before now. There is a simple process for you to re-plat the lots if you are not in a restricted subdivision. Just go to the Travis County Engineers office or contact a lawyer.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Nov 11, 2013

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
You really should act fast to be try to be sure that the use does not establish a prescriptive easement over your land giving them legal rights and diminishing your properties value. Hopefully, that did not happen before you bought it. You should sit down ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Dec 17, 2013

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
That type of matter really deserves to be evaluated by sitting down with a real estate & litigation lawyer to evaluate the documents, disclosure and agreements made. It could be that you may have a claim that could be brought in Court for your damages ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Jan 24, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
Buying AS-IS means just that, unless there was deliberate fraud or concealment. The roof is open and obvious for your inspection, so it seems like you are getting what you asked for, an AS-IS sale without any obligation for the Seller to fix anything. ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Jan 29, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
You may not have to do that...! Let us have a look at your paperwork please! For a free consultation contact me. Edward ------- EMAIL: propertylawyer@live.com ------- WEBSITE: www.bizlaw.pro ------------------------------ --------------------
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Jan 10, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
While it really depends on the Deeds, in most cases land (without a mortgage on it and no conflicting claims) is freely transferable and she can transfer if over to you. You will just need a Deed drawn up, sign it, get it notarized, and take it down to ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Feb 3, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
No, not without creating greater potential liability for even more and attorneys fees. Additionally, a lease to purchase is typically a very one-sided and poor investment choice that should be avoided if possible. TREC forms also may require a real estate ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Feb 8, 2014

Edward J. Kazaleh's answer
I've done a lot of Condo law including lawsuit against rouge Boards for individual owners. Its difficult to understand exactly what you are asking here. In most situation, there would be no reason to ever sue an individual (if I'm getting ...
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Dec 27, 2013

Douglas J. Shumway's answer
There are a number of ways that an easement can be created but many times the exact rights associated with a non-contractually created easement are hard to nail down. You would be well served to hire a local real estate lawyer to go over the specifics of ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Nov 21, 2013

Douglas J. Shumway's answer
The answer to your question is a lot more complicated than you might assume. The type of ownership is important, any agreements associated with ownership might have an impact, and the potential liability associated with re-taking the property should be ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Oct 18, 2013

Douglas J. Shumway's answer
Generally this sort of situation is governed by what is generally known as a "due on sale" clause. Most loan documents have a provision that restricts the transfer of property and when you transfer the property (assuming the lender discovers such ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on May 31, 2013

Douglas J. Shumway's answer
As I am sure any Texas lawyer will agree, you should put all agreements in writing so that in the future you don't have problems arise that are extremely expensive to litigate. Generally neighbors don't have problems until one or the other sells ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Jul 27, 2013

Douglas J. Shumway's answer
Association law can be very complex because there are statutory elements and contractual elements to the analysis. If Texas law does not provide you with a non-waivable statutory right to have contact information of other owners then you are going to rely ...
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Aug 8, 2012

Cheryl Rivera Smith's answer
Contact an attorney to prepare a warranty deed. It should cost about $100 plus filing fee.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Apr 9, 2012

Cheryl Rivera Smith's answer
If you suspect wrong-doing by the Board, then it is best for the other owners to get together and consult with an attorney.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Mar 11, 2012

Cheryl Rivera Smith's answer
Pay your back dues. If that is not possible, then possibly the HOA will offer a payment plan.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Texas on Jun 4, 2012

Cheryl Rivera Smith's answer
If you were awarded the house, then probably yes. Check your divorce decree for restrictions. You may want to record your decree so that your husband's name is taken off of the title.