Columbus, OH asked in Immigration Law for New Jersey

Q: When a greencard holder arrive to u.s air port the immigration officer will ask what type of questions?allways or every

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3 Lawyer Answers
Gus M. Shihab Esq
Gus M. Shihab Esq
Answered
  • Immigration Law Lawyer
  • Columbus, OH

A: Dear Sir/Madam,

When a green card holder arrives at any port of entry, whether by see, land or airport, the Customs & Boarder Protection Officer will inquire relative to the length of absence. The CBP office may ask any other question he deems are necessary to ensure that the legal permanent resident did not abandon the US. Please note that absence over a year may be treated as a prima facie evidence of abandonment of permanent residence and could lead to the legal permanent resident to be placed in removal proceedings.

I hope I answered your question.

Gus M. Shihab

www.ShihabImmigrationFirm.com

Rodney John Alberto
Rodney John Alberto
Answered
  • Immigration Law Lawyer
  • Forked River, NJ
  • Licensed in New Jersey

A: Yes, Immigration officer may ask any question that is geared to determine whether you are "admissible". What makes an individual "inadmissible"? Well, think of the things you would ask (or MIGHT ask) if your child if he wanted to bring a friend to dinner, e.g. is he healthy / clean, is he a good kid (no criminal record), he hasn't lied (immigration fraud), etc. Because you a legal permanent resident, and not a Citizen yet, the immigration officer can inquire into your admissibility. I agree with the attorney's answer below, extended periods of absence may be regarded as "abandonment" of one's residency, and could pose problems. Any crimes that you have may pop up, and inspire further investigation. I hope this helps. Atty. Rodney Alberto, 732-200-0779. www.VisaBrothers.com

Rodney John Alberto
Rodney John Alberto
Answered
  • Immigration Law Lawyer
  • Forked River, NJ
  • Licensed in New Jersey

A: Yes, Immigration officer may ask any question that is geared to determine whether you are "admissible". What makes an individual "inadmissible"? Well, think of the things you would ask (or MIGHT ask) if your child if he wanted to bring a friend to dinner, e.g. is he healthy / clean, is he a good kid (no criminal record), he hasn't lied (immigration fraud), etc. Because you a legal permanent resident, and not a Citizen yet, the immigration officer can inquire into your admissibility. I agree with the attorney's answer below, extended periods of absence may be regarded as "abandonment" of one's residency, and could pose problems. Any crimes that you have may pop up, and inspire further investigation. I hope this helps. Atty. Rodney Alberto, 732-200-0779. www.VisaBrothers.com

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