Saint Peters, MO asked in Probate for Florida

Q: My father left his farm in Florida to me but the deed was still in my mother (died 2003) and fathers name.

The lawyer in Georgia is saying I may have to share this with my siblings from my mothers first marriage even though both my mothers will and fathers will state I inherit the farm. My mothers will was never probated Dad had what he thought was rights of suvivorship

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2 Lawyer Answers
Andy Wayne Williamson
Andy Wayne Williamson
Answered
  • Probate Lawyer
  • Santa Rosa Beach, FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: Can’t say for sure without first reviewing the deeds ect. Not sure where the Georgia lawyer comes into play but you need to consult with a Florida probate attorney to get a proper evaluation of the deeds on the farm and the two wills.

Good luck.

John Richert
John Richert
PREMIUM
Answered
  • Probate Lawyer
  • Clearwater, FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: You definitely need to consult with a Florida probate attorney. Once an attorney can review the deeds and the wills, he or she should be able to tell you what needs to happen to transfer the property and the distribution. If the farm is located in Florida, it will likely need to be probated in order to be transferred. Our firm offers free consultations.

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