Orlando, FL asked in Employment Discrimination and Employment Law for Florida

Q: I work at a food establishment in Florida when I was hired the starting pay was $11 an hour about 6 months ago they wen

T up 50 Cent to 11:50 then raised it now to $13 an hour anybody that has now hired is making $13 which I make $11.55 do or does my employer have to raise my pay 2 at least match the 13 which is there starting pay I am training people to do the same job I'm doing that make more money than I do. So my question is is it against the law in Florida to raise the pay of one employee that was just hired but not of an employee that has already been at the company??

2 Lawyer Answers

Terrence H Thorgaard

Answered
  • Freeeport, FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: No, they don't have to pay you any hourly rate above the minimum wage.

Kevin Sanderson

Answered
  • Employment Law Lawyer
  • Sarasota , FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: Many actions that are fundamentally unfair on their face are not illegal in Florida, unfortunately. You might consider if you are being discriminated against based on a protected class. At this exact moment, it loos like we have an employees market more than at any time in the past 10 years. Talk to them and if they will not match the pay and maybe make up the difference for past hours, look at moving on.

1 user found this answer helpful

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