Granbury, TX asked in DUI / DWI for Texas

Q: Does a DUI, due to being underage and having alcohol, count towards the 3 DWI rule to make it a felony in Texas?

Got a DUI at around age 17, which is because I admitted to having a beer and was given a ticket and released to parents. Got an actual DWI, refused breath test and visibly drunk, at around age 19. No issues since, just wondering if it should happen again if it would be a felony.

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2 Lawyer Answers

Paul Looney

Answered
  • DUI & DWI Lawyer
  • Houston, TX
  • Licensed in Texas

A: You are a "repeat" DWI offender based on your record. Not a felony DWI offender. However, if you are thinking about the possibility of it happening again, then your conduct has not been adjusted to assure it does not happen again. So, it WILL happen again ... eventually. Here's a clue. You live in a community that is heavily opposed to drunk drivers. Do not drive, even if you have just had a few. You are too young to drink if you cannot plan how you are going to get home. Just don't drive. Or better yet, go to a few AA classes and find out where you are headed. Find out if you have an alcohol problem. You are mighty young to be dealing with these issues. You probably need more help than a ride home when you have had a few. Good luck to you.

Paul Looney

Answered
  • DUI & DWI Lawyer
  • Houston, TX
  • Licensed in Texas

A: The subpoena is for some person and can be served "in care of" the named persons. The persons to be served can be served in care of the named persons. Drug investigators are served subpoenas, in care of another person, for the purpose of bringing the unnamed person to court. Usually it is these two officers who have control of a confidential informant, or confidential source, and the officers want to keep the identity of the informant confidential, so "John Doe" is used for the informant, c/o the officers. This is a way to get an informant before the court, usually in an in camera hearing before the judge only, without the public knowing this person is an informant. All above board. All the way it should happen. The judge will then make a ruling on whether the informant's identity is made known to the lawyer for the person charged. Hope this has been helpful, and good luck.

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