New Haven, CT asked in Wrongful Death for Connecticut

Q: is a medical examiner supposed to contact next of kin when a person dies to ask if they want an autospy?

-My mother passed away on tuesday, and upon talking to her doctor he expressed she was in good health aside from hypertension and gallbladder issues. I was not contacted asking if i wanted a autopsy and he himself was not. she received the covid vaccine two days prior to her passing so i feel as if they are trying to cover things up on their end. I just want to know in what way should this have been handled.

Related Topics:
1 Lawyer Answer
Steven Basche
Steven Basche
PREMIUM
Answered
  • Glastonbury, CT
  • Licensed in Connecticut

A: First off, I am sorry for your loss. The loss of a parent leaves a huge whole in one's heart. The State of Connecticut requires that the Medical Examiner examine deaths due to accident, homicide, suicide, and unknown causes, specifically "sudden or unexpected deaths not caused by readily recognizable disease." The law requires the next of kin to consent to an autopsy, but does not specifically give the next of kin the right to ask for an autopsy. You could try to ask them to perform an autopsy, but be prepared to wait for a while because the ME's office is backed up.

Justia Ask a Lawyer is a forum for consumers to get answers to basic legal questions. Any information sent through Justia Ask a Lawyer is not secure and is done so on a non-confidential basis only.

The use of this website to ask questions or receive answers does not create an attorney–client relationship between you and Justia, or between you and any attorney who receives your information or responds to your questions, nor is it intended to create such a relationship. Additionally, no responses on this forum constitute legal advice, which must be tailored to the specific circumstances of each case. You should not act upon information provided in Justia Ask a Lawyer without seeking professional counsel from an attorney admitted or authorized to practice in your jurisdiction. Justia assumes no responsibility to any person who relies on information contained on or received through this site and disclaims all liability in respect to such information.

Justia cannot guarantee that the information on this website (including any legal information provided by an attorney through this service) is accurate, complete, or up-to-date. While we intend to make every attempt to keep the information on this site current, the owners of and contributors to this site make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to from this site.