Denver, CO asked in Consumer Law, Car Accidents and Wrongful Death for Colorado

Q: Can I get a car manufacturer to immediately repurchase a vehicle for a critical safety defect?

At 6.5 mo/6762 miles, while driving 79-80 mph (in a 75 zone), without warning it did the following:

Loud sound under hood

Engine stopped

Electrical system shut down, inc. dash/audio

Rapid deceleration (engine braking, still in drive)

Power steering/braking inactive

Dealer has had in shop for 2 days and can't find any indication of a fault or reproduce the issue, and they return vehicles when they can't reproduce a problem and fix it.

Colorado lemon laws require that this defect must lead to 4 service visits or 30 days in the shop within 1 year. Is there no exception to this process for vehicles that impose such high potential risk for crash and fatality? If I have to reproduce this 3 more times, those would be likely since most of my driving is done in rush hour going up to 70 mph with tailgaters.

If the next incident involves a crash/fatality will that be enough to take action?

Any legal ramifications for selling a car with known safety defects?

1 Lawyer Answer
Peter N. Munsing
Peter N. Munsing
PREMIUM
Answered
  • Personal Injury Lawyer
  • Wyomissing, PA

A: Generally, no. Contact the center for auto safety to see if there have been similar complaints on that model.

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