Saint Petersburg, FL asked in Contracts, Copyright and Legal Malpractice for Florida

Q: What does B.A.R mean? Lawyers are members, what does it mean? Why are you a member? I was told it is British!?

I need clarification, this site is called ask a lawyer, not ask google, what are you hiding or is that a part of the b.a.r (secret)?

3 Lawyer Answers
Marcos Garciaacosta
Marcos Garciaacosta
Answered
  • Intellectual Property Lawyer
  • Mesa, AZ

A: Did you try google?

Phillip William Gunthert agrees with this answer

Linda Liang
Linda Liang
PREMIUM
Answered
  • Intellectual Property Lawyer
  • Boca Raton, FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: I googled it for you.

Etymology. The use of the term bar to mean "the whole body of lawyers, the legal profession" comes ultimately from English custom. In the early 16th century, a railing divided the hall in the Inns of Court, with students occupying the body of the hall and readers or benchers on the other side.

Phillip William Gunthert
Phillip William Gunthert
Answered
  • Orlando, FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: BAR- An organization of lawyers established to promote professional competence, enforce standards of ethical conduct, and encourage a spirit of public service among members of the legal profession.

The Florida Bar is the integrated bar association for the state of Florida. It is the third largest such bar in the United States. Its duties include the regulation and discipline of attorneys.

The Florida Bar is the integrated bar association for the state of Florida. It is the third largest such bar in the United States.[3] Its duties include the regulation and discipline of attorneys. The Florida Bar is also responsible for the governing of Florida Registered Paralegals.

As elsewhere in the United States, persons seeking admission to the bar must pass a moral character screening, in this case administered by the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. Admission to the Bar includes passing a background investigation, the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination, and the bar exam, which tests both the common law through the Multistate Bar Examination and Florida law through written state essays and state-specific multiple-choice questions.

The Florida Bar's headquarters building and annex are located in Tallahassee, three blocks from the Florida State Capitol.

History

In 1889 the first, small, voluntary group of lawyers formed in Florida.[5] This developed into the Florida State Bar Association in 1907. This remained a voluntary organization, publishing a legal journal, drafting court procedures, and presenting occasional educational courses for lawyers. Its membership never exceeded a few thousand.

With a sharp increase in the number of lawyers after World War I came interest in requiring lawyers to join the Florida State Bar Association, both as a means of improving communication within the profession and of disciplining unethical lawyers. However, the Florida Supreme Court declined to order this until 1949.

In April 1950, the Florida State Bar Association met for the last time. The name was shortened to "The Florida Bar" and the state's 3,758 lawyers automatically became members. Its first president was Richard H. Hunt of Miami.

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