Hollywood, FL asked in Consumer Law, Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Florida

Q: florida law. can a new owner of a motel that i have lived month to month for 3 1/2 years tell me to leave in one day?

motel has no lease and i pay month to month. i have been here for a little more than 3 and 1/2 years. the new owners knocked on the door and told me i had to vacate the premises by tomorrow. if it matters i am 70 years old and am a heart patient. please advise. thanking you in advance.

2 Lawyer Answers

A: Sorry but there are not enough facts to fully answer your question. Generally, motels and hotels can ask you to leave by checkout the next day. They are not residential properties. If your room is paid up past tomorrow they might honor that if there is proof the room was paid.

Jane Kim
Jane Kim
Answered
  • Naples, FL
  • Licensed in Florida

A: It is 15-days notice whether you are deemed a commercial or residential tenant. If it is for non-payment (does not sound like it) then under commercial leases there is a 3-day notice requirement. At this point, they will have to follow formal eviction procedures to actually evict you. Therefore, I would not worry about being evicted "tomorrow" but I'd look for another place to live. You cannot force them to keep you as a tenant. Eventually, they'll figure out proper notice requirements.

Good luck.

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