Questions Answered by Paula J. Mcgill

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for Maryland 18 days ago

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You should seriously consider consulting with an attorney to discuss this matter. Even if you decide after the consultation to do it alone, you will have more information to assist you in handling the matter alone. In any event, go online for the ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce Law for Georgia 11 days ago

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
Depending on the county where you want to file, the forms may be online. Check online with the superior court of ______County. Just remember, getting a divorce is not just a series of forms. It is knowing the law, the rules of the court, the rules of ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for New York on Mar 18, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You may want to call CPS to do an investigation. If neither parent can adequately care for the child, you should file a petition for guardianship. This can be done by consent of the parents or after a hearing. You may want to consult with an experienced ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce Law for New York 16 days ago

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You have to do if they are under 21. Otherwise, you can state that all children from the marriage are 21 or over.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for New York 14 days ago

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You didn't state if you had an attorney or why he didn't enforce the order. If you haven't had an attorney previously, you should seriously think about hiring one.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Georgia 18 days ago

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
Normally, yes. At this point, there is nothing in Georgia or federal law that prevents employers from looking on someone's facebook page. If you don't want your employer or strangers to know what is on your social media pages, increase the ...
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Divorce Law for Georgia 23 days ago

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
If he won the lottery, you need to consult and possibly hire local counsel to (1) confirm if he won the lottery, (2) review the court file, (3) review the transcript of the bench hearing, and (4) obtain other evidence. Good luck.
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law for Maryland on Feb 25, 2012

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
If you are not required to pay for private school under the current order, you are not obligated to do so. However, your ex-wife can seek a modification of the order.
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law for Maryland on Oct 9, 2013

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You or someone in the same situation asked this question on another site. File for a limited divorce (which is a legal separation in other states). The limited divorce will place him on child and spousal support.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for Georgia on Mar 9, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
Leave the state for what, vacation, or permanently? If you are leaving permanently, you should obtain permission from the court and notify all interested parties. If your request is granted, once you move, the new state will have jurisdiction of the ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for Georgia on Mar 13, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
He can subpoena anyone he wants. It's up to you or the person who receives the subpoena to file to quash the subpoena or to object at trial about the testimony as irrelevant to the issues. However, relevancy will be determined by the judge.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for New York on Feb 25, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
If the text messages can be authenticated, yes, the court may let them into evidence to show she violated the order.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for New York on Feb 28, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
If the New York court order states you have to pay until the child turns 21 or is emancipated, you must continue to pay child support until released by the court. The court may decrease your child support obligation based upon changes in income. If he ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for Georgia on Feb 22, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You may be entitled to spousal support, and if you have custody of the children, you will be entitled to child support. You should visit an attorney in his/her office to discuss this further. If you reside in the Atlanta metro area, I am available to ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce Law for Maryland on Feb 3, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
It all depends on a number of factors including: (1) whether you were a housewife during the marriage and for how long; (2) the relative education levels; (3) the relative earning capacities; (4) the ability for you to return to the workplace; and the ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce Law for Maryland on Feb 17, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
You should seriously think about getting an attorney. Even if you cannot pay, your husband may be ordered to pay for all or a portion of the fees. In addition, if you have been a housewife for 8 years, you may be entitled to alimony. Don't short ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce Law for Georgia on Jan 30, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
More information is needed. Did you file for divorce? If so, what grounds? Has she been served? Has she filed an answer? Did she state any defenses? You may not have assets, but do you have liabilities together? Is there a dispute regarding who gets ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce Law for Georgia on Feb 10, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
Moving to another state does not stop alimony. However, it may change jurisdiction. I recommend you take the divorce to any attorney to determine your rights. Each order is written differently. Therefore, an attorney cannot properly advise you without ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for New York on Jan 10, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
It all depends. If you aren't covered under FMLA or other disability laws and you're an employee at will, you can be fired for any reason that is not otherwise covered by the law. Based on the information you provided, it does not appear you ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for New York on Jan 15, 2014

Paula J. Mcgill's answer
File a motion for contempt. The court should issue an order to force her to return through arrest or otherwise. The court may also change custody and give you full custody. With that order, you can go the police in the state where the children are located ...