Illinois Workers' Compensation Law Questions

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Feb 15, 2013

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
This is a complicated question. If you are asking in IL how much you will be considered disabled under the law there are many factors. A seasoned attorney will review all your medical records, educational background, job, age and numerous other factors to ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Mar 15, 2013

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
If you have an IL claim you should contact and IL attorney right away as this is too complicated to be answered in one posting. This is taken from the IWCC website:http://www.iwcc.il.gov/insurance.htm "What happens if an insurer goes bankrupt? If an ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Jan 31, 2013

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
It is extremely difficult to give you a straight answer because a lawyer needs to review all your medical records, bills, wage, doctors at issue, whether your employer sent you to a fair "IME" which is really a Section 12 DEFENSE doctor exam in ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Jan 12, 2013

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
Each case is different but I normally counsel clients not to sign any other release when handling comp case. However, you may be getting additional consideration for resigning I don't know. Only you and your attorney know the facts of your case and ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Jan 22, 2013

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
It depends on whether you can prove the case or not but surgery is not necessary by itself to have a settlement. You never have to get ANY treatment you do not want to get. It is important to note that if you settle your case you usually close out your ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Nov 5, 2012

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
Do you mean should you continue to work? You can check on your employer's insurance status on the IWCC page on insurance at http://www.iwcc.il.gov/insurance.htm. This can answer many questions you have. If you are injured you may still proceed with a ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Aug 20, 2012

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
Some companies are self-insured and may become bankrupt. Also, some companies are insured by a work comp insurance company. Normally speaking, there are some protections like the Illinois Guaranty Fund which can step in if insurance and employer are not ...
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Apr 12, 2011

Burton A. Padove's answer
The amount paid is partially due to a diability rating as well as your prior earnings history.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Nov 10, 2011

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
I am not quite sure if you are speaking of only employees who have injured each other. In Illinois if you are an employee and are injured by a non-employee (here maybe another truck driving through an intersection-not clear) then you could possibly have a ...
 
 

2 Answers | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Jan 5, 2011

Burton A. Padove's answer
As far as I know, that number applies to the number of dependents as disability levels are based on percentages as opposed to an indication based ona numeric value.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on May 7, 2012

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
That is an interesting question. Adjusters can be from several different states and still negotiate a file. They are not like lawyers who must be licensed in the state they practice. A good place to look for information on workers' compensation cases ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Nov 22, 2011

Timothy J. Deffet's answer
In some instances an employer can file an appeal or hearing based on a change in circumstances in your treatment even though you may have been awarded lifetime benefits. Also, appeals can be very lengthy and last years. It is difficult to tell from your ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Workers' Compensation Law for Illinois on Jan 9, 2011

Robert D. Kreisman's answer
Once the case is presented to the arbitrator and the proofs are submitted for consideration, the arbitrator's decision should be submitted within 30-60 days. The decision of the arbitrator in the Industrial Commission can be appealed.