Los Angeles, CA asked in Car Accidents for California

Q: What is a "request to disclose limits" from my insurance via the other driver in a car accident claim?

I was involved in a car accident where the other driver made a left turn into oncoming traffic. He is now claiming that I ran a red light and was speeding and caused the accident (not true and the forensic evidence on the vehicles proves that). He has hired a lawyer and has requested the amount of policy limits on my policy. I need to sign a letter to release this information as it is private. I received a letter requesting my signature. 1.) Why would they request this? Is it common? 2.) Should I sign it? 3.) What kind of repercussions would there potentially be if I don't sign it?

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4 Lawyer Answers
William John Light
William John Light
Answered
  • Personal Injury Lawyer
  • Riverside, CA
  • Licensed in California

A: 1) To find out how much money your insurer might pay. Yes, it's common.

2) Yes, you should sign it.

3) You are more likely to be sued because disclosure of policy limits information is required, upon demand, in a lawsuit. Disclosure is only voluntary before a lawsuit. Why make it easier to get sued?

Justin R. Heim and Tim Akpinar agree with this answer

Dale S. Gribow
Dale S. Gribow
Answered
  • Personal Injury Lawyer
  • Palm Desert, CA
  • Licensed in California

A: more info needed.

you should consult with a lawyer AND you auto ins carrier.

You shouldn't be talking to the ins co for the other side............your lawyer or ins co should do that.

yes it is common

Tim Akpinar agrees with this answer

Peter N. Munsing
Peter N. Munsing
PREMIUM
Answered
  • Personal Injury Lawyer
  • Wyomissing, PA

A: If you were hurt and the other driver is at fault you need to talk to a member of the Consumer Attorneys of California for the county where the wreck happened---they give free consults.

Let your insurance handle the other side--that's what you pay insurance for.

Tim Akpinar agrees with this answer

Tim Akpinar
Tim Akpinar
Answered
  • Personal Injury Lawyer
  • Little Neck, NY

A: You could provide them with the information; it's standard practice to request it. But as for information beyond that, such as providing a statement or other information, it would be advisable to consult with an attorney. A claimant could make statements under oath or at a deposition that could be used against them two years later at trial. Good luck

Tim Akpinar

Justin R. Heim agrees with this answer

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