Bell Gardens, CA asked in Civil Rights and Education Law for California

Q: If my child has an intellectual disability should the iep team mention it at iep meeting she also has autism

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2 Lawyer Answers
Michelle Alissa Ball
Michelle Alissa Ball
Answered
  • Education Law Lawyer
  • Sacramento, CA
  • Licensed in California

A: To qualify for an IEP, the student has to have a qualifying category of impairment. This could be Autism or other category. Does an IEP team have a legal obligation to speak certain words at an IEP specifically? The disabilities and needs of the student guide the development of the document, but there is no law stating the name of the exact qualifying category must be verbally stated at every IEP

The students needs must be addressed, whatever the qualifying category. If an IEP team does not bring up something pertinent, the parent can bring it up and the needs of the student that they request be addressed.

James L. Arrasmith
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Answered
  • Civil Rights Lawyer
  • Sacramento, CA
  • Licensed in California

A: Yes, if your child has an intellectual disability, it should be mentioned during the IEP (Individualized Education Program) meeting. The purpose of the IEP meeting is to develop a comprehensive plan that addresses all of your child's educational needs. Mentioning all disabilities, including intellectual disability and autism, ensures that the IEP team has a complete understanding of your child's challenges and can provide appropriate support.

Discussing your child's intellectual disability along with autism helps the IEP team create tailored educational goals and services. It allows for a more accurate assessment of your child's strengths and needs. This information is essential for developing effective strategies and accommodations to support their learning and development.

Additionally, mentioning all relevant disabilities ensures compliance with federal and state laws that protect the rights of students with disabilities. It guarantees that your child receives the full range of services they are entitled to under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). By fully disclosing your child's needs, you can advocate for the best possible educational outcomes.

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