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Florida Immigration Law Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Do i have to prepare for a second interview?

You

Im from germany and im here in the usa with a valid non immigrant working visa. My current employer whants to sponsor me and transferring into another non immigrant work visa class. Back in Berlin i had already the interview at the consulate. Do i have to prepare for another one here... Read more »

Adan Vega
Adan Vega answered on Feb 19, 2020

A request for a change of non- immigrant status does not require an interview with USCIS. You should be in lawful status when the request is made with USCIS.

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: how long does it take to receive final order if automated info system says the judge granted relief?

Because of a missing document the judge couldn’t make an immediate decision at my removal hearing. I mailed the document next day, and about 2 weeks later, I received a copy of the letter ice sent to the judge indicating they received and accepted the document and waive their right to appeal.... Read more »

Linda Liang
Linda Liang answered on Feb 17, 2020

You can go to the clerk's office and ask for judge's ruling.

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2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: My mother is a citizen she applied for me in 2016. I have since divorced. Can I apply under a different category.

I live in the US

Kevin D. Slattery Esq.
Kevin D. Slattery Esq. answered on Feb 17, 2020

You don't need to reapply. Rather, you and your mother could send notification to USCIS (if the petition is still pending there) or to the National Visa Center (if the case is now there) that you have divorced with proof thereof (e.g., divorce judgment). Using the existing petition, they will... Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Someone wants to come to us from Italy what needs to be done
Stephen Arnold Black
Stephen Arnold Black answered on Feb 14, 2020

more facts are needed..is this a foreign national spouse or fiance of a US citizen/green card holder? a parent of US citizen? discuss with counsel about the facts of your case in a free consultation.

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2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Withdrawing N400 with fee waiver

I am going through financial difficulties, but always tried to find my way out. I submitted a N400 application with the fee waiver form I912. However, after I had sent off the form, my sister sent me the money to pay the application fee. I called the post office to stop the mail from being... Read more »

Hector E. Quiroga
Hector E. Quiroga answered on Feb 12, 2020

Wait until a decision is made on the application/fee waiver. If it is approved, you can give the money back to your sister. If not, you can refile with the fee.

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2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Good afternoon, can someone who was deported to Cuba, ammend the registered agent of their LLC?

The current registered agent to an LLC was deported to Cuba. They'd like to ammend the registered agent, how can go about this?

Terrence H Thorgaard
Terrence H Thorgaard answered on Jan 28, 2020

Go to https://dos.myflorida.com/sunbiz/ and find the form to change the registered agent. I would be very surprised if it can't be done without regard to where the registered agent is currently located.

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3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: My mother (green card holder) married an US citizen. I got my green card from him. How long I become a US citizen?

My mother has a green card. My stepfather is a US citizen and I got my green card from him. Do I have to wait 3 years or 5 years to become a US citizen?

Kevin D. Slattery Esq.
Kevin D. Slattery Esq. answered on Jan 20, 2020

The "3-year rule" applies to a permanent resident applying for naturalization who is married to and living with a U.S. Citizen. So, unless you would be basing your own naturalization application on your marriage to and cohabitation with a U.S. Citizen, notwithstanding how you obtained your... Read more »

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3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: 3 years wait time for naturalization, can some time counts towards that 3 years?

I am married to an american citizen for 10 years prior to coming to the US, in 2018, on an L1-A (manager transfer) visa. I received my green card last December of 2019 after a petition for alien relative.

I understand naturalization has a 3 years wait time before applying, after obtaining... Read more »

Kevin D. Slattery Esq.
Kevin D. Slattery Esq. answered on Jan 20, 2020

Unfortunately, no. The 3-year clock regarding eligibility for naturalization under INA § 319(a) begins as of the date you acquired U.S. legal permanent resident status.

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4 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Is it going to be a problem if someone overstayed leave to go back to own country?

Hi my friend from Canada over stayed , now she wants to go back to Canada , will she be in trouble when she leaves ?

Stephen Shaiken
Stephen Shaiken answered on Jan 13, 2020

The U.S. is unlikely to give here any problems leaving, but if she tries to return, and the inspector at the port of entry has information which causes them to determine she overstayed, it could be a problem. Would depend upon several factors, including the length of overstay and status in which... Read more »

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4 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: My girlfriend lives in Italy. I was born and raised in the United States. I own a business. How can my girlfriend stay?

I have a business

I am an investor

I would be able to create a trust with her name.

She is interested in being able to stay for half of the year, and travel back the other half.

Lorenzo Arca
Lorenzo Arca answered on Jan 13, 2020

Good morning,

There are several immigration vehicles that may be suitable for you and your girlfriend. Deciding which alternative is best, will largely depend on your personal goals, circumstances and the means available to you in order to achieve those goals. Therefore, to advise you on...
Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Family Law and Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Attempting to immigrate to Israel. My birth certificate lacks my late father's name. I need to prove paternity in court.

In order to immigrate to Israel, I need legal evidence from the court or department of vital statistics affirming that my father is indeed my biological father. Both my parents are deceased. I have collected extensive evidence thus far, including my father's will which names me explicitly as his... Read more »

Kevin L Dixler
Kevin L Dixler answered on Jan 11, 2020

You may have to be content with life in the United States unless there is a Zionist organization with an interest in supporting your cause. Immigration is considered a civil right. An Israeli immigration attorney may be able to consider the next steps, but you income will likely create challenges... Read more »

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1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: How do I locate an immigration attorney who's able to provide competent pro bono work to a disabled college graduate?

I suffered a motorcycle accident 5+ years ago and only attempting to determine how to allow my VERY recently married Registered Nurse wife the ability to work here in the US, possibly near where we reside in north Pinellas County Florida

Amanda B Cook
Amanda B Cook answered on Jan 9, 2020

That depends on where you live. Sometimes, you can find resources in pamphlets at your local immigration court, if you are close to one. Catholic Social Services sometimes can help. I would need to know where to live to give you better advice. If you are indigent, though, you will not be able to... Read more »

3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: Married a woman from the Philippines 12/27/19. Brought to the US on a fiancé visa and now uncertain what to next? Help!

We've already filed a marriage license and been legally married but in order to give her the ability to work here as I am on disability what should I do next?

Kevin D. Slattery Esq.
Kevin D. Slattery Esq. answered on Jan 7, 2020

Consider scheduling a consultation with a competent immigration attorney who can discuss with you the next steps to take. As part of the process involves you submitting on her behalf a Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, which requires demonstration of a certain level of income for you, and because... Read more »

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3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: 22 mths and 10 days of waiting for i751 waiver (abuse) to be resolved. Can I file for naturalization? Or wait in limbo?

I haven't heard any about case since July 2019...I have since relocated and changed my address and was told my case is at my current local office. It is Frustrating...Feb 2018 Filer.

Kevin L Dixler
Kevin L Dixler answered on Jan 4, 2020

How strong is the evidence presented for your self petition? Did you submit enough evidence to support all of the elements of a claim? There may be complications about to emerge. The delay may be the result of a pending investigation.

It also depends upon whether you qualify for...
Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law, Estate Planning, Foreclosure and Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: How do I go about getting some pro Bono help with an illegal executor fraud And the omitting of a will

Their surplus funds $33,000 vehicles $28000 and a $25000 inheritance to be accounted for. I've been in the dark and told that I was not allowed to find out anything and so probate was over and we have never talked to this guy nobody knows him in now we're homeless because the house got foreclosed... Read more »

Seril L Grossfeld
Seril L Grossfeld answered on Dec 31, 2019

After the fact is the wrong time to start this. First, at least in Florida a non relative cannot be a personal representative if they live outside the state. Second a probate proceeding is a court proceeding and any irregularities should have been brought to the Judge's attention that is why the... Read more »

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1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Immigration Law and International Law for Florida on
Q: How can I get my undocumented daughter back from the U.S after I've been deported?

I've been deported. However, my undocumented ex-girlfirend and undocumented 3-year old child remain in the US. She refuses for me to have any communication with her and is now in a situation where her current boyfriend's ex-wife is threatening to hurt my daughter. His ex-wife is upset that my... Read more »

Kevin L Dixler
Kevin L Dixler answered on Dec 29, 2019

Your decision not to marry her complicates matters. If you are on the birth certificate, you will need to assert your right to joint custody at a minimum. In doing so, you may be required to help support your son. You can be forced to prove that he is, in fact, your son. This is really more of... Read more »

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: If I submitted my I751 as married and then get divorced a few months after do I need to re submit the i751 as divorce?

I have submitted my I751 and it was recieved Sept 2019. I have recieved the I797 with the 18 month extension. I have caught my spouse cheating on me and do not wanna stay in the relationship due to her actions. Do I need to do anything regarding the I751?

Thank you !

Kevin L Dixler
Kevin L Dixler answered on Dec 29, 2019

Yes, when your divorce is final, then you need to notify the USCIS. In addition, you should preserve all evidence of your relationship including maintaining good relations with your in laws, if possible. This can prove complicated, when you have irreconcilable differences with your wife. As a... Read more »

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1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law and Tax Law for Florida on
Q: switching from S-Corp to LLC under E2 visa

Hello, I have an E2 visa and live in FL. My business is an S-Corp and I wish to close or transition it into an LLC, as the taxation featured of LLC suite my needs more than S-corp. Am I legally allowed to make this move without compromising my visa status? I own 100% of the business and just want... Read more »

Svetlana Kats
Svetlana Kats answered on Dec 27, 2019

Hi there! Changing your company's tax status from s corp to LLC will not affect your immigration status. Just make sure that your ownership in the company does not change.

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: It's been 3.5 years since I came to the US after L1B was issued. Can I still switch from L1B to L1A? Or too late?

I'm on my L1B, and it's been 3.5 years since I came to the US.

Knowing that L1B has 5 year max duration, just based on the timeline, I am wondering if I would be still eligible to apply for L1B to L1A conversion now.

I worked as a manager for the company oversea, and also I was also... Read more »

Linda Liang
Linda Liang answered on Dec 20, 2019

Yes, you still can.

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Florida on
Q: what's a fair price a immigration lawyer should charge me for 601A in Florida 2019!?
Stephen Arnold Black
Stephen Arnold Black answered on Dec 13, 2019

You should call around. Most counsel charge between 4 to 5 thousand. Other counsel charge less, but it depends on the unique facts of each case.

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