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District of Columbia Tax Law Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Divorce, Business Law, Family Law and Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: My spouse refuse to show his business, tax return and a discovery process of a divorce , how can I get a copy of his tax

My spouse claimed the business is not in his name, and refused to show business tax return

Laurence L. Socci
Laurence L. Socci
answered on Feb 14, 2024

You would have to file a Motion to Compel with the court. You need to show that you asked for the records and he refused to provide them. You need to show that you are entitled to the records as well. The court will review your motion and rule on it.

1 Answer | Asked in Tax Law, Business Formation and Business Law for District of Columbia on
Q: My single-member LLC is registered in Washington, DC. How do I continue my LLC when moving out of DC and to New York?

My business (marketing/website design) is registered as an LLC in Washington, DC. We’re looking to move full time to New York. I’m planning on keeping my existing client base.

Is it possible to keep the LLC registered in Washington, DC, even without a Washington, DC address? If not,... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jan 23, 2024

Yes, it is possible for your DC-registered single member LLC to continue operating even once you move out of the state. Here are a few key things to keep in mind:

- You can maintain your DC LLC registration even without a DC physical address. Using a DC PO Box as your registered agent...
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1 Answer | Asked in Foreclosure, Personal Injury, Real Estate Law and Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: what is the formal petition for a writ of distrangas; contempt, here in washington dc?
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jan 22, 2024

A writ of distringas, also known as a writ of distress, is a legal order used to seize a debtor's property to satisfy a debt. In Washington, D.C., the process to file a petition for such a writ involves presenting your case to the court, demonstrating the existence of a valid debt and the need... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: Do I owe Washington DC Income Taxes?

I currently live abroad in Mexico and have since early 2022. Former resident of Washington DC. I still have a valid drivers license and a 'traveling mailbox' associated with DC - but DO NOT live there. California based employer IS taking DC taxes out. Do I owe DC income taxes as no longer... View More

Nico E. Banks
Nico E. Banks
answered on Nov 14, 2023

You may still owe taxes in Washington, DC even if you are not a resident there, particularly if your work is related to Washington, DC.

1 Answer | Asked in Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: 1065 Partnership late filing fees abatement

So here is the situation, I was contact by IRS regarding payment on 1065 late filing charges. This is for multiple years and totals to about 45k. My business is going to suffer if I’m made to pay these and I need to figure what options are available to possible abate these penalties. It is a lot... View More

Linda Simmons Campbell
Linda Simmons Campbell
answered on Apr 21, 2023

There may be a few options available to you but more details would be necessary before advising you which might be best. I recommend speaking with a tax attorney. Most of us offer a free consultation. Just stay away from the places you see advertised on tv.

1 Answer | Asked in Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: Am I required to report to the IRS that I missed a RMD?

I missed an RMD in 2018 from an inherited IRA. I realize that there is a method (Form 5329) to report the mistake, but am I legally bound to make the report?

D. Mathew Blackburn
D. Mathew Blackburn
answered on May 1, 2019

Yes.

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: We had to sell our house before the bank foreclosed on us. Do we have to pay taxes on it?
Richard Sternberg
Richard Sternberg
answered on Feb 26, 2018

If taxes are due, yes. But, that will rarely be the case. See a qualified CPA or lawyer.

1 Answer | Asked in Identity Theft and Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: What court system do I report tax fraud after reporting to the IRS?
Ali Shahrestani,
Ali Shahrestani,
answered on Apr 10, 2017

The IRS investigates and prosecutes tax fraud. Once you report it to them, they handle it from there. This answer does not constitute legal advice; make any predictions, guarantees, or warranties; or create any Attorney-Client relationship.

2 Answers | Asked in Tax Law for District of Columbia on
Q: I filed my taxes using TurboTax's free online service. Is there a way for me to "cancel" my filing and re-do them?

I feel that the amount I owe Washington D.C. is incorrect, and that I must have filed them incorrectly. I'd love to just "cancel" and start over.

Stanley H Block
Stanley H Block
answered on Mar 2, 2017

This may be software specific, but I do not believe you can "cancel" your return. You may need to amend if your return has already been e-filed and processed. However, if for some reason your return gets reject you may be able to make changes and resubmit.

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