Idaho Immigration Law Questions & Answers

Q: How quickly can I get a fiancée visa for my future wife who's a Japanese citizen?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Nov 16, 2018
Ms Grace I Gardiner's answer
Right now it’s taking seven to eight months for the interview. It takes six months for the approval of the visa itself

Q: Can I renew my license with the I-797 notice action in Idaho?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Sep 13, 2018
Jordan C. Moody's answer
The I-797 notice of action is the same title for all government receipts, so more information is needed. Reach out to an attorney in your area. Some of them offer free consultations. This answer will depend on the type of application you have filed.

Q: My friend was beat, robbed, held at gunpoint , home broken into. I-918 needs signed. Cops won't sign..WHY??

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on May 30, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Your friend should meet with an immigration attorney who is experienced in U visas.

Q: For the U Visa I'm having the local law enforcement sign I-918 form!! I would greatly appreciate it if I could get help

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on May 30, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
If law enforcement will not sign the I-918, you are ineligible for a U visa.

Q: If someone I contract out with hires illegal aliens, am I going to get prosecuted?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on May 10, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Possibly. Not a good idea.

Q: I'm on an I type visa and would like to get a driver's licence in the state of idaho.Is it possible? Thanks.

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on May 10, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
You are on an I visa? If so, you should be able to get a drivers license. Speak with the motor vehicles department in Idaho.

Q: Does America accept divorces obtained in Denmark? (Regards to K1 visa)

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce and Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Feb 21, 2018
Jordan C. Moody's answer
With a few nuances, the rule is that if the divorce decree is accepted by a recognized government, the U.S. agencies will recognize it for purposes of immigration, K-1 in your case.

So in this situation, if Denmark recognizes the divorce with the documentation that you have, then U.S. agencies will as well.

Q: can a european citizen visits an inmate in USA state prison? Is it even possible are they any options? please help.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Jan 5, 2018
Jordan C. Moody's answer
That will depend on the rules of the prison, but the process would be to call the prison and ask if a person would be able to use a foreign passport as a form of ID during an inmate visit.

Q: I'm the victim of domestic violence/strangulation and with minors present, can I drop the charges and set the abuser fr

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Nov 21, 2017
Jordan C. Moody's answer
This is a question for a criminal defense attorney, and I would seek a consultation with a one as soon as possible. But the prosecutor cannot have your children taken away if you refuse to testify. That can only be decided by a judge.

If there were signs of physical injury, the prosecutor can bring charges without your cooperation.

If you have follow up immigration questions, please let me know. Victims of crimes can qualify for immigration benefits, but only if they are...

Q: can a person with no amercian citizenship visit a incarcerated?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Immigration Law and Criminal Law for Idaho on
Answered on Sep 28, 2017
Jordan C. Moody's answer
That's going to depend on what identification documents the prison will accept. Call the prison where your boyfriend is being held and ask them what forms of ID would be accepted for visits. A foreign passport should be sufficient for them.

Q: Can I apply for asylum if I change my religion while in the United States

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Aug 22, 2017
Jordan C. Moody's answer
Yes. You will not need to worry about the one year deadline because of a change of circumstances, and because you are in current lawful status. Consult an immigration lawyer for specific direction based on your specific case.

Q: What is adjustment of status?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Jun 23, 2017
Jordan C. Moody's answer
Adjustment of status is when a non-immigrant visa holder "adjusts status" to that of a legal permanent resident, or green card holder. An example would be a student visa holder marrying a U.S. citizen and "adjusting status" to that of a legal permanent resident green card holder, based on their marriage to a U.S. citizen. Adjustment of status is not to be confused with a "change of status" which is when a non-immigrant visa holder changes status to that of another non-immigrant visa. In other...

Q: Is the local police force in my town required to work with ICE?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Apr 20, 2017
Jordan C. Moody's answer
Local law enforcement can choose to work with ICE, but they can also choose not to. States and municipalities do not have any obligation to enforce federal laws, including immigration enforcement. It will depend on your local law enforcement's policy.

Q: My British Company has been hired to host an event in the US. Will we need work visas?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Feb 20, 2017
Jordan C. Moody's answer
When will this take place, and who is the U.S. company contracting you? How big is the core team? Two weeks is a very short time, so you might just look at a way to use the ESTA program. For something bullet-proof, you might want to do P visas if we can classify your core group as an "entertainment group." Definitely consult an immigration attorney.

Q: What does it mean if you get a notice to appear in immigration court?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Jan 26, 2017
Matthew J Hartnett's answer
It means the Department of Homeland Security believes that you are in the United States without valid status and is seeking to remove you from the United States. This is called removal proceedings. You should contact an immigration attorney (preferably an AILA member) to evaluate a proper defense (asylum, adjustment of status, cancellation, etc) and represent you before the immigration judge.

Q: Eligibility for Green Card

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Nov 22, 2016
Jordan C. Moody's answer
In order to be eligible for an application for a green card, he needs a legal entry. This can be done through an application for advanced parole through his status as a DACA recipient. Schedule a time to meet with an immigration attorney to go through the details. Some attorneys offer a free consultation.

Q: I am asylum seeker in italy can I travel to country close to my country of origin

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Oct 31, 2016
Jordan C. Moody's answer
You have to look at whether this travel will allow the government to argue that you are not afraid to return to your country of origin. It is possible, but it might not help your case. Consult an immigration attorney with the specific facts of your case for a more specific answer.

Q: I have a friend that came to america on a F1 visa and then applied for an OPT post visa and it was cancelled.

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Sep 20, 2016
Jordan C. Moody's answer
After the F1 and OPT, it does not revert to an F1. From what I can tell from these facts, the person is now out of status and will have a 60 day grace period to leave or fix their status. Contact an immigration attorney so they can get all of the facts and give you the most accurate legal advice. This response does not constitute legal advice. Good luck!

Q: Renting house on H1B

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Idaho on
Answered on Sep 2, 2016
Jordan C. Moody's answer
As long as you are not an "employee," you aren't violating your visa requirements. Consult an immigration attorney to get a concrete answer for your specific case.

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