Adoption Questions & Answers

Q: I have a gf who’s 27(f) and her mom won’t let her decide to do things on her own at al. Can I sue her mother for her?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Child Custody for Illinois on
Answered on Jan 23, 2018

No, you can't sue on her behalf. On the other hand, your girlfriend became an adult on her 18th birthday and can move out if she wants to. IMPORTANT: This does not apply if your girlfriend is a developmentally disabled adult and a court has appointed her mother as the guardian of her person.
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Q: Can my husband who is currently incarcerated still have rights to see and speak with his child?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody and Family Law for Illinois on
Answered on Jan 23, 2018

If your child is adopted by your mother and step-father, the parental rights of the biological mother and father are typically terminated. The incarcerated father must be made a respondent to the adoption and has a right to object to it.
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Q: Wondering if my husband can legitimize my daughter. She's not his. No support 8 years from ncp. Adoption cost too much.

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Child Custody for Georgia on
Answered on Jan 23, 2018

Nope, adoption is the only option. Shop around. You may find an attorney that doesn't charge as much.
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Q: My friend just found out that her wife is still married to her ex husband. Can my friend get custody of the kids?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody, Divorce and Family Law for Oklahoma on
Answered on Jan 22, 2018

WOW, sorry I didn't see this earlier. This one is a bit complicated, and it doesn't look like there is any good answer for your friend. Since your friend's wife is still married to another man, their marriage to each other is void. These children have a father and a mother. I think, based on the limited information I have, that your friend technically has no legal grounds to seek either custody or adoption. However, there are so many factors involved here, your friend should consult an...
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Q: How to request legal cousnel due to income to reapond to petition for adpotion in oklahoma where they say no constent ne

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law and Adoption for Oklahoma on
Answered on Jan 22, 2018

Gosh, sorry you are so far away from McIntosh County. First, I would ask the Judge to appoint an attorney for you. Before doing this however, you should phone some attorneys who practice in that county, and see if you can hire them with a down payment you can afford, and a payment plan for the balance. Standing to lose all rights to your children is an important right, and if you are indigent, and unable to hire an attorney on your own, one should be appointed for you. If for some reason the...
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Q: Im the one that asked about the emancipation so say if my parents dont want to sign it what else can i do?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Child Custody for New Jersey on
Answered on Jan 22, 2018

Your parents have a constitutional right to make decisions about you. If they're just acting in your best interest and you just don't like it, you should reconsider what you're trying to do and the shame you might bring them. If you already thought this through carefully, try talking to another adult family member or school counselor that you trust. However, if you're a victim (e.g., child abuse) call social services.
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Q: Does conservatorship end with the adoption of a minor? As the legal parent now, can I access my child's funds?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Probate for Michigan on
Answered on Jan 22, 2018

The conservatorship continues until either the judge terminates it after you file a motion requesting it be terminated or the child turns 18. Most counties are going to continue the conservatorship and require the annual accountings.
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Q: I am 16 and being beaten by my adopted parents and dcs is looking into it, is it illegal for me to run away?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Family Law and Juvenile Law for Tennessee on
Answered on Jan 21, 2018

You cannot run away. You should tell DCS the truth. You should also tell DCS about your desire to run away. This may get them to get you some help.
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Q: My fiance wants to adopt my twins, their father is in prison, does he have to sign over his rights for that to happen?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Family Law for Ohio on
Answered on Jan 20, 2018

You and your fiance must first be married. The natural/biological father's consent is necessary except under limited and specific circumstances as they may exist at the time the Petition for Adoption is filed with the Probate Court.
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Q: I want to know how can a minor get emancipated from his parents

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody and Juvenile Law for New Jersey on
Answered on Jan 20, 2018

If you're a minor in New Jersey you must have moved "beyond the sphere of influence" of both parents. This means the court must first find that you're responsible, independent, able-bodied, not attending school, not on public assistance, not in need of financial support, no longer relying on your parents for medical insurance, mad money, driving you around, cooking your food, buying you stuff, walking your dog, cleaning your room, providing you with physical, emotional or psychological support,...
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Q: Would i be able to choose where i want to live if my mother loses custody but i have only seen my father a couple times?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Child Custody for Florida on
Answered on Jan 20, 2018

Until you are 18, no.
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Q: how do I give my fiance parental rights to my son?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Juvenile Law for Virginia on
Answered on Jan 20, 2018

Adoption. The most preferred method would be an agreed step parent adoption. Biological father is entitled ot notice, and if biological father does not agree, you will need to have a child and prove that termination is in the child's best interest. These are hard cases, and mere abandonment rarely rises to a significant level if the biological father wants to resume a relationship.
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Q: can I see my nephew if my brother signed over his parental rights?

3 Answers | Asked in Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody and Patents for Georgia on
Answered on Jan 19, 2018

Not unless the adoptive parent agrees.
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Q: My son's biological father has not contacted him in a year and a half. Is this abandonment?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Child Custody for Florida on
Answered on Jan 18, 2018

Probably, for purposes of adoption. But when you husband files to adopt, the son's father would still have to be given notice of the court action.
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Q: My cousin passed away and her 2 children have never met their father how do I get full custody

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody and Family Law for New Jersey on
Answered on Jan 17, 2018

Custody cases are rarely 'straight forward'. You'll need to retain a family law attorney to file an application for change of custody and argue the case for you.
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Q: I have been taking care of my foster child sense she was born, she is now 8 years old and have been adopted by her aunt

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody and Family Law for New Jersey on
Answered on Jan 17, 2018

If you were with her since birth until she was eight then you are likely to be deemed her psychological father by the court. It's important to your foster child's well-being that you stay in her life. You should contact an attorney to help you.
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Q: My boyfriend’s younger brother age of 13 has been living with us for about 20 months , what steps do we need to take for

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody and Child Support for Georgia on
Answered on Jan 16, 2018

You can file for guardianship and / or custody. Both the mother and the father of the child must be served.
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Q: Does the court make you provide proof of income and stability to obtain custody of children after the parents die?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Child Custody for Ohio on
Answered on Jan 16, 2018

Before a court will award custody, the court will require information that the person can provide a suitable home environment, has sufficient income, etc. The court will decide what is in the best interest of the children. If your mother is not able to provide a proper home, contact children's services. If you want to obtain guardianship, use the Find a Lawyer tab and retain a local family law or probate attorney to assist you with the process.
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Q: birth dad hasn't had contact for 7 yrs she's 8

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law and Adoption for Georgia on
Answered on Jan 16, 2018

Yes, he will have to be served and the court would have to terminate his rights.
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Q: I have a 8 year old daughter and 3 year old son. My 3 year old is not biologically mine but im On the birth cerificates.

2 Answers | Asked in Divorce, Adoption and Family Law for Colorado on
Answered on Jan 15, 2018

You need a court order which defines your custody rights. The 3-year-old may be your legal child, even if not your biological child. You should retain an attorney to help you do this.
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