Adoption Questions & Answers by State

Adoption Questions & Answers

Q: Can a child that is 16 about to be 17 leave home if drugs are in home?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Child Custody for Ohio on
Answered on Mar 27, 2017

Take her with you where? To a different state? Where is he and where are you - PA or OH? Is he ex-husband from a divorce, or ex-boyfriend? Is there a parenting agreement or custody order from a court - from which state? If so, what does it say about custody and moving? If there are good reasons to change the order, then file with the court to change it and you then can provide evidence and testimony about why changes are needed. Use the find a lawyer tab to contact a local family law...
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Q: Parents are going their separate ways. Together there are three dogs, growing up the little dog has always been mine.

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Mar 27, 2017

Maybe you can ask your parents to buy or have the 3rd dog? More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me, my credentials, awards, honors, testimonials, and media appearances/ publications on my law practice website. I practice law in CA, NY, MA, and DC in the following areas of law: Business & Contracts, Criminal Defense, Divorce & Child Custody, and Education Law. This...
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Q: What steps will be necessary to gain custody of my nephews?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody and Family Law for California on
Answered on Mar 26, 2017

In order for you to be considered you must first file a petition for guardianship. Yours will be a competing petition with your parents who have already been granted temporary guardianship. You and your parents should have a meeting to determine which home provides the best environment for your nephews. If you and your parents cannot resolve who will proceed with their petition, the court may set the matter for trial. Therefore, it would be imperative to work out an agreement with your...
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Q: Why won't my name be put on my 18year old stepdaughter's birth certificate when I adopt her?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption for Colorado on
Answered on Mar 25, 2017

There is a difference between child adoptions (which does replace the birth parents) and adult adoptions (which does not replace the birth parents). If you proceed with an adult adoption you will receive a certificate from the court and a document from the county recorder. It will look a lot like a birth certificate, but it is not technically the same thing as a birth certificate (technically it is an addendum). That is, officially the 18 year old will have the original birth certificate (with...
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Q: My boyfriend received his first contempt hearing appointment to show cause for non-payment of child Support.

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Support, Criminal Law and Family Law for California on
Answered on Mar 24, 2017

He should hire a lawyer to respond to the complaint and provide evidence of his financial limitations. Has child support been terminated since the adoption? More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me, my credentials, awards, honors, testimonials, and media appearances/ publications on my law practice website. I practice law in CA, NY, MA, and DC in the following areas of...
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Q: Is it more difficult to get approved if I want to adopt multiple children at once (for examples, siblings)?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption for California on
Answered on Mar 24, 2017

Yes possibly. See: http://www.childsworld.ca.gov/pg1302.htm

More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me, my credentials, awards, honors, testimonials, and media appearances/ publications on my law practice website. I practice law in CA, NY, MA, and DC in the following areas of law: Business & Contracts, Criminal Defense, Divorce & Child Custody, and Education Law....
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Q: Can I legally adopt my 18yearold stepdaughter who's still in high school w/o notifying the birth mother first?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption for Colorado on
Answered on Mar 24, 2017

Adult adoptions (for people over 18 years old) are very simple in Colorado and do not require notification or consent from the birth parents. There should not be a trial or appearance in court.

A legal adult adoption does NOT sever the legal bonds to the birth parents (unless their rights were terminated) or change birth certificates, etc. What it does do is cause the adoptee to functionally have 2 fathers, 2 mothers or 2 of both. A legal adoption does create a legal connection between...
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Q: I have a friend who is pregnant with twins and wants to give them to me the day they are born. how do I make it legal?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody and Family Law for Texas on
Answered on Mar 23, 2017

Contact a local family law attorney right away. The attorney will be able to discuss your options and begin preparations for the adoption process. The mother cannot sign anything until after the babies are born, but you can begin working with your attorney to get things ready ahead of time. The attorney will not be able to represent both you and the birth mother, so if she wants legal representation, she will have to hire an attorney. Best wishes!
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Q: why do I need to see a judge to change my daughters name if iv had her for 15 years, its 1 letter that were changing

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Adoption for Texas on
Answered on Mar 23, 2017

If you want to legally change your daughter's name, you will have to go through the name change procedure with the courts. If there is another parent, the other parent will have to be notified and agree with the change. It is a pretty simple process. Contact a local family law attorney who can review all of the facts of your situation and then advise you as to your options.
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Q: I also have another question I was adopted when I was two days old to a white family and I'm native American .

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption and Native American Law for Oregon on
Answered on Mar 21, 2017

You will need a DNA tests of yourself and father, birth certificates, and your father's CDIB card to help get this started. You have to work this thru your tribe.
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Q: can someone adopt a child and not have legal papers /have any papers

2 Answers | Asked in Adoption and Child Custody for Florida on
Answered on Mar 17, 2017

Adoption is done through the courts. There would have been a written court order signed by a judge, but the adoptive parent might not have a copy of it.
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Q: Can my soon husband adopt my daughter without consent of biological if he has not paid child support

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption for Arkansas on
Answered on Mar 17, 2017

If he has not paid child support or seen the child in one year, you may be able to get around his consent to the adoption.
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Q: I'm a resident of North Carolina can I request my son father parents right terminated, based on abandonment over 6 yrs??

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody and Child Support for North Carolina on
Answered on Mar 16, 2017

If you and the child have resided in NC for at least the last 6 months, it may be possible to petition to terminate parental rights. If you are successful in terminating his right you will also terminate his obligation to pay child support - you don't get both. Contact a local family law attorney to go over your options. Best of luck!
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Q: I have had a child in my care for the past 6 years. I am not the childs biological father, the child was removed by DHS.

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Child Custody and Family Law for Arkansas on
Answered on Mar 16, 2017

To your question on visitation rights: You should be able to get court-ordered visitation because you have stood in loco parentis to the child. You may also be able to get custody or even adopt the child, depending on the particular facts of your case.
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Q: my boyfriend is coming down and wants me to sign adoption papers for his daughter the mother gave up her parental rights

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Family Law for Oregon on
Answered on Mar 15, 2017

This is a bad idea, and I would advise against it for many reasons. Mother can't just give up her parental rights, unless they were terminated by a court order. You will need a judgment/decree of adoption, which will make you the legal parent of the child. You should consult with an attorney before proceeding further on this.
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Q: My soon to be husband wants to adopt my 4 month old daughter. Can the father give up his rights.

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Family Law for Indiana on
Answered on Mar 14, 2017

Congratulations on your future nuptials. After you are legally married, your new husband can adopt your 4 month old daughter. The biological father can give up his rights by consenting to the adoption or refusing to contest the adoption.

It can be much more complicated than that if the biological father chooses to contest the adoption.

However, there are also certain instances where the biological father does not have to consent, such as when the biological father has...
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Q: I am a female married to a female can both of us legally sign the birth certificate?

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Child Custody for Indiana on
Answered on Mar 14, 2017

Yes. This was actually litigated and decided on in the past year. Indiana must list both spouses in same sex marriages as parents on their children's birth certificate.
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Q: I have two grandchildren in foster care under kingap, I was wondering how can I adopt them

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption and Family Law for New York on
Answered on Mar 9, 2017

See: http://ocfs.ny.gov/adopt/adopt_faq.asp

Are the parental rights of both parents terminated, or do the parents agree with the adoption? More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me, my credentials, awards, honors, testimonials, and media appearances/ publications on my law practice website. I practice law in CA, NY, MA, and DC in the following areas of law:...
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Q: Can my husband and I adopt my cousin's daughter who is 13 from overseas?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law, Child Custody and Adoption for California on
Answered on Mar 9, 2017

More information is needed to answer the question.

In general relative adoptions are highly suspect and there are special requirements when the child is not an orphan.

You will need to research foreign adoption requirements yourself or consult with an attorney who is experienced in foreign adoptions.
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Q: My sister took our 4 month old puppy to a rescue, she didn't sign anything surrendering her can we legally get her back

1 Answer | Asked in Adoption, Animal / Dog Law and Civil Rights for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Mar 7, 2017

You can try. But the law is murky--she gave him and didn't ask for anything. You can also get a lawyer to tell the person to take down the listing.
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