New Hampshire Landlord - Tenant Questions & Answers

Q: My landlord is expecting me to pay his electricity an if I choose not to he's raising my rent up each month.

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on Jan 10, 2019
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
Look at the rental agreement or lease you signed, read what it states about paying for utilities and follow the written document that you have. I don't understand why you would be paying for his electricity so I cant figure out what the agreement-if any-you have with the landlord.

Q: If I have a specific eviction date is there a way for me to make payments on the past due amount and have it be legal

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on Dec 12, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
You can always ask the landlord to extend. If the eviction is not court ordered then they must evict you through the courts, which will take about 14-30 days to get the hearing date, the court may also allow you to pay the amount due plus costs and void the eviction.

Q: i rented out a room in my single family home. Owner Occupied house. the renter was here for 30.days and moved out withou

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on Nov 5, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
Was there anything in writing evidencing that it was a month to month rental? Be very careful with security deposits, the courts do not like it when they are not given back, and not giving it back can result in attorney fees and damages against you for not doing so without proper legal grounds.

Q: My son who is disabled had a verbal lease month to month with his girlfriend. In the process an aquatance established .

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights, Contracts, Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on Nov 5, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
If in fact, as you state, she has a month to month tenancy, then you have to give her 30 days notice to quit the apartment. These cases are tricky, if she won't leave, you should hire an landlord tenant attorney. attorney Brian Shaughnessy is the attorney I use to evict my own tenants. He is one of the best in the state.

Q: Does my previous landlady have 30 days to return security deposit from when I returned keys, or end of my 30 day notice?

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on Apr 4, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
The date you left the premises if after the end of the lease or rental period, not before, unless by agreement of the parties. Read the Lease to see what it states.

Q: My landlord entered my apt without permission not for any emergency twice is the lease still valid? Can I leave?

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on Dec 8, 2017
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
What are the reason(s) the landlord stated for having to go into your apartment? Check your Lease to see what the conditions are for him to do so, most leases contain a clause that they can enter in emergency situations. If it was not an emergency you should call the police and file a report, getting out of the lease may be a bit more tricky but if the landlord is entering your apartment without reasonable grounds to do so, getting out will be easier. Good luck!

Q: Can I sue college for inhabitable dorm conditions?

1 Answer | Asked in Education Law, Landlord - Tenant and Personal Injury for New Hampshire on
Answered on Mar 10, 2016
Israel Piedra's answer
Yes, you most likely could. All lessees of real estate, including students in dorms, have a right to the quiet enjoyment of their residences.

Now, as a practical matter lawsuits are very expensive. It could easily cost $2,000 just to file such a lawsuit. If it went all the way to trial, that cost could rise to $10,000 or more. Therefore, many people would seek alternative means of resolving the issue, such as dealing with the housing administration at the college directly, or...

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