New Hampshire Questions & Answers

Q: Can I post photos of celebrities, musicians, etc. on my own personal website if I'm deriving profit from the website?

1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Intellectual Property, International Law and Internet Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 24, 2018
John Espinosa's answer
If you are using it to make money it is not a personal use but a commercial one. Don't use the photos without getting permission from the copyright holder.
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Q: My US citizen husband dies, what will happen to my N-400 since 3-year rule no longer applies?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Yes, your N-400 application will be rejected without a refund, and you will need to wait for the 5-year rule to apply for naturalization. Sorry.

Q: If I get charged with a DUI, can my student visa get revoked?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Very possibly. However, only your visa is revoked. You will still remain in F-1 student status, but you will not be able to travel abroad unless and until you obtain a green card.

Q: Are there any alternatives to H-1Bs for companies who need to hire foreign workers?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Sure, there are many alternatives. Here are a few:

TN visas for Canadian and Mexican professionals

E-3 visas for Australian professionals.

L visas for executives, managers and persons with specialized knowledge who are transferring from an overseas branch of a company to a parent, affiliate or subsidiary company in the US.

There are many more possibilities.

Q: How long does it take for adults from Brazil to gain U.S. citizenship in 2018?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
If they have green cards, they can apply for naturalization after 5 years.

Q: If an H1B visa holder has a kid, is that kid a US citizen?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
The child is a US citizen if he/she is born in the US.

Q: If a person alleges to have been bitten by a dog & goes to the ER and no report is filed report is proof of no bite met?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 8, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
Have you seen the report? The report form a hospital emergency room or doctor should state the injury complained of and a finding by the assisting nurse or physician.
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Q: 3 siblings own home in tension common. On wants to sell & threatens to file act of partition. Can one sibling buy out

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 8, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
You can make any agreement you want to make, as long it is legal. make sure you hire an attorney to handle the transaction and file the proper documents in the registry of deeds.
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Q: A home owned by three siblings. One wants to sell the others do not. The property is owned as tenants in common.

2 Answers | Asked in Real Estate Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 8, 2018
Vincent Gallo's answer
A buyout is a most viable option instead of a partition action which could be costly and become emotionally heated.
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Q: My landlord gave me 72 hours to vacate citing N.H civil code RSA 540:9, Can she do that

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 6, 2018
Salim U. Shaikh's answer
Sufficient details are missing in order to render a specific advice. Hence, please elaborate : how long you have been living as tenant to the current LL? Do you have a lease agreement? If so, there will be terms that govern eviction or termination of contract and she is bound by that. Or otherwise, LL has to formally deliver you a written notice to vacate the premises stating certain cause of actions, etc., which is always subject to challenge / recourse in the court of your jurisdiction....
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Q: Yes my manager says I owe on rent and has given me 3 days to vacate or have the police remove me. Can she do that

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 6, 2018
Joseph Kelly Levasseur's answer
This is a landlord/tenant question not a civil rights question, only the government can violate your civil rights. There are not enough facts to indicate the type of Lease or rental agreement you have, but in order to force an eviction, it has to be done through the courts. make sure you have been served properly and the rules for service and rules for a proper eviction are done correctly. The laws of the state (RSA) protect both parties fairly equally, but tenants do have rights. Best to hire...
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Q: If they wont release my title or repossess the truck, can I sell it as a parts truck with no title or part it out?

1 Answer | Asked in Bankruptcy for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 4, 2018
Timothy Denison's answer
Sure. Send them a letter putting them on notice of when and where to get the truck. If they haven’t responded in a year and a half, they’re not going to. Give them 30 days and keep a copy of your letter as proof. After they don’t respond, do with it as you will.
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Q: Finance company refuses to take the truck I let go in the bankruptcy. They wont release my title. What can I do with it?

1 Answer | Asked in Bankruptcy for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 3, 2018
Timothy Denison's answer
2 options. 1). Take it to their office, Park it in the parking lot and drop the keys in the night box. 2). Continue driving it until they repo it, it dies, is wrecked, etc. The debt has been discharged so the only recourse they have is to repossess it.
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Q: My children's father I divorced 8 years ago. I want to modify child support. Now he wants a paternity test. Can he?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Child Custody and Child Support for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 2, 2018
Amy C. Connolly's answer
I believe that he can request challenge paternity, however, he may run into a problem if he testified under oath that he was the biological father.

Q: Can I keep my kids a day of Dad's time for an important party I gave him 31 days notice for?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Child Custody for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 2, 2018
Amy C. Connolly's answer
I believe you should check the language of the parenting plan. It usually contains a provision that each parent should make reasonable accommodations to deviate from the plan. I think that this would constitute a reasonable request. I do not believe that this would constitute "immediate or irreparable" harm to the children if they did not attend, so I do not believe you would have grounds to file an immediate motion with the court. However, he should make the accommodations because it sounds...

Q: If a 3yr old child resides in Pa with mother BirthC is blank and the potential father is nh where does DNA take place

1 Answer | Asked in Child Custody and Family Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 2, 2018
Amy C. Connolly's answer
If the child has live in PA for more than 6 months, that is the child's home state so paternity would be determined in PA. I hope this helps.

Q: Parenting plan in place. Ex & lawyer have said that I'm allowed a 15 mile move, if I go 5 mi. over that am I in contempt

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Child Custody for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 2, 2018
Amy C. Connolly's answer
You would not to go jail If you moved outside of the designated areas, however, it could be grounds to change the parenting plan. The law on modification of parenting plans has changed and you may be able to move to amend that portion of the parenting plan based on your facts. I hope this helps.

Q: I have majority parenting time, I want to move with my son back to my home state. How likely is the court to allow this?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 2, 2018
Amy C. Connolly's answer
In order to relocate you have to give the other parent 60 days notice of your intent to move. If the other parent objects, the court will need to decide if (1) if the move is for a legitimate purpose; (2) if the move is in the children's best interest. In general, the court will not favor allowing the primary parent to move out of state. In my experience, the only time a parent is permitted to move far away is if the parties have come to an agreement. I hope this helps.
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Q: My son paid a fine in court but he just got a paper in the mail saying he needs to pay? He already did! Plz help...

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 2, 2018
Amy C. Connolly's answer
If he paid by credit card or check you should obtain the records to bring to the court to show proof of payment. The court should have issued a receipt, you should try to find it and bring it to the clerk's office. I hope this helps.
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Q: Is it OK for my GAL to forward our private email's to the opposing counsel without my permission?

2 Answers | Asked in Divorce, Family Law and Child Custody for New Hampshire on
Answered on May 1, 2018
Joseph Caulfield's answer
Unless you've agreed to something else in the GAL Stipulation, the GAL's file is open to both parties, meaning everything can be obtained.
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