Pennsylvania Estate Planning Questions & Answers

Q: Two organizers on a real estate LLC and one dies, does #2 own it all? Bradford PA

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning and Real Estate Law for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Nov 23, 2018
Mark Scoblionko's answer
You need to review this with a lawyer. However, if you write a Will and leave your interest in the LLC to her and, at the same time, insert a provision in your Operating Agreement to express that that is your intent, you should be able to accomplish this.

Remember that there will be an inheritance tax on the value of the LLC that passes to her, and you must provide for that.

You can also review with a lawyer if it makes sense to have the LLC jointly owned between you and her....

Q: My mother remarried, she recently died. My stepfather is saying that his attorney told him he does not have to go to

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Nov 3, 2018
Peter Munsing's answer
If there is a will it should be probated. Ask for the name of his attorney; tell him if he won't tell you you hate to do it but you'll have to hire one. If the 401k has someone else as beneficiary he can't change that. Assuming you are all adult, then her will governs. He can't play keep away. Another way is to force it --if you have an older will see about probating that then he'll have to provide the newer will. But you all really need to see an attorney who handles estates in the county...

Q: Is stipulation withdrawing w/prejudice issues of estate, adopted as order, agreed to by all parties, final?

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Family Law and Real Estate Law for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Nov 1, 2018
Cary B. Hall's answer
I'll be honest . . . your situation is way too complicated to get a competent answer here. You really need to sit down with an attorney who practices regularly in the Orphans' Court, and discuss your situation in detail with him/her. At that point, you can pose your question. And you should do this immediately as there are surely deadlines and time limits in the current court litigation.

Best of luck to you.

Q: My mother passed away as life estate grantor to my brother, his wife, and myself. I want to drop off new deed.

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Estate Planning and Real Estate Law for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Oct 2, 2018
Elizabeth Tarasi's answer
In the deed you would state $1 as the consideration. Also because it is between family members you are exempt from realty transfer tax in Pennsylvania. No gift issues.

Q: My mother passed while she was on medicaid. All she had were 2 small insurance policies ( 5k per). Do I need to probate

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Insurance Bad Faith and Probate for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Sep 23, 2018
Elizabeth Tarasi's answer
The insurance policy usually names a benificiary. Generally you do not probate when the only assets are insurance policies.

Q: I recently received Praecipe to Reinstate/Reissue involving my late aunt's mortgage. Why would I and what can I do?

2 Answers | Asked in Estate Planning, Foreclosure and Real Estate Law for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Sep 8, 2018
Cary B. Hall's answer
When litigation is filed -- including mortgage foreclosure cases -- the named Defendant must be served with the suit papers in a particular way, and there is a time limit for this to occur. If service is not made within this initial time period, the Complaint must be "reinstated" or "reissued," and then the time limit starts over for the Plaintiff to try to serve the suit papers again.

Best of luck to you.

Q: My gram passed away, she left me some money. I lent that money to my mom, she spent it all, how can I get it back?

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Litigation, Estate Planning and Probate for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Aug 21, 2018
Cary B. Hall's answer
You may have to sue your mother in civil court -- although if she has no money in which to satisfy any civil judgment against her, all you'll be left with is the judgment paper itself at the end of the day. Perhaps she'd be willing to enter into some kind of repayment plan?

Best of luck to you.

Q: Are deceased sibling's children now "issues" to an uncle's intestate estate in PA entitled to funds therefrom?

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Aug 19, 2018
Michael Cherewka's answer
It is unclear from your summary whether your mother had a Will or not. These are very fact intensive and time sensitive issues. In general, based on your description above, if your mother was alive when your uncle died, and your mother was a beneficiary of his estate at the time of his death, then your mother died after your uncle, but before his estate was distributed, your mother's estate would receive the distributions from your uncle's estate.

You state above that you were not a...

Q: Distribution of intestate PA estate from uncle to nieces and nephews. He had no wife, children, parents, or siblings.

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Aug 17, 2018
Michael Cherewka's answer
Under the circumstances you describe, since your mother survived your uncle, she was entitled to her share of your uncle's Estate when he died, and once she died any distributions from your uncle's estate would typically be made to your mother's estate. There are some limited exceptions to this general rule. You may want to consult an attorney to see if any apply in this case.

Q: I am a neighbor to a woman here in pa..

2 Answers | Asked in Estate Planning and Elder Law for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Aug 15, 2018
Mark Scoblionko's answer
I don't know what your question is. The fact that the daughter holds a Power of Attorney is irrelevant. That would not give the daughter the right to remove those things without her mother's consent.

Q: will splits property 50/50 with my bro but than sets value of her farm at a low rate gives bro right of 1st refusal

2 Answers | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Aug 12, 2018
Michael Cherewka's answer
It is unclear from this summary if this is a Will and a separate agreement which is a combination of a sale and gift, or if this is all set forth in a Will. In general there is nothing wrong with a partial sale/partial gift, but as you have described it there are a lot of questions regarding if there are other provisions to equalize the estate if your brother exercises the right, who pays the inheritance taxes on the value of the property, etc. since your Mother expressed an intent for the...

Q: Hi.. I have an estate and special needs trust question as the bengiciery. Estate is in Pittsburgh PA

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Real Estate Law and Probate for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Jul 22, 2018
Elizabeth Tarasi's answer
I would need to read both wills and the trust to answer your question.

Q: One of my sisters was named as the executor of my mother’s will.

2 Answers | Asked in Estate Planning, Medical Malpractice, Nursing Home Abuse and Wrongful Death for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Jul 18, 2018
Elizabeth Tarasi's answer
According to Section 8301 of the Pennsylvania Wrongful Death Act, the wrongful death action seeks to compensate a decedent’s loved ones for the death of the decedent when that death was caused by the negligence, unlawful violence, neglect, or wrongful act of another. Traditionally, wrongful death actions sought to compensate the decedent’s family for the economic loss caused by the decedent’s death, usually by awarding damages for the income the decedent would have earned had he or she...

Q: Should my deceased brother's name be removed from mother's will?

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Jul 13, 2018
Mark Scoblionko's answer
Although that is probably correct, to give a definitive answer a lawyer would have to review the Will. However, even if it is correct, if your mother is doing okay, it probably makes sense to re-write the Will.

Q: Please see the more information section for the full details, I couldn't write a question that fit.

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on May 29, 2018
Kathryn Hilbush's answer
Unfortunately your question went out to consumer and family law attorneys. Your theory sounds logical but the best way to fully understand what has happened and what needs to be done is to consult with an experienced probate and estate law attorney. I would assume that estates will have to be opened for your cousin and his mother. Did the mother leave a will? If so, you'll certainly one to provide a copy to the attorney when you meet.

Q: A friend's mother died in Sept. 2017 with a will, leaving the house to her son who had resided with her.

1 Answer | Asked in Probate and Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on May 18, 2018
Kathryn Hilbush's answer
The family should consult with an experienced trusts and estates attorney to be sure this is done correctly. You can best help them by steering them that way.

Q: my mom passed the only thing she has is the house would like to see to family member i have power of attorney live in PA

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning for Pennsylvania on
Answered on May 8, 2018
Mark Scoblionko's answer
I am not sure what the question is.

Once your mom died, the Power of Attorney is no longer valid. If she had a Will, you need to have a lawyer probate the Will to open an estate. Whoever is designated as Executor/Executrix would be appointed as such. The house would then be distributed as provided in the Will.

Note that there will be inheritance tax and administrative and legal fees associated with handling of the estate. You could be forced to sell the house to address...

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