Florida Business Law Questions

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Feb 18, 2011

Andrew Bresalier's answer
Yes. You can do it when you do your Annual Filing for no additional charge, or you can do it at some other time for a fee. This is done, via sunbiz.org. www.dont-sweat-the-debt.com
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Mar 23, 2011

Andrew Bresalier's answer
Confidentiality Agreements are generally used to protect secrets. Unless the organization has formulas or other priority info, there should not be such a need.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Jun 24, 2011

Andrew Bresalier's answer
A Professional Association can only be owned by licensed professionals of that trade; however, a professional and/or a nonprofessional can work for a business entity that is not a PA.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Nov 12, 2012

Andrew Bresalier's answer
It is done all the time by closely held business. If there is no one to complain, there is generaly no problem. The thing is, the more involved, the more things like this become an issue.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Feb 28, 2013

Andrew Bresalier's answer
Such a relationship is dictated by the terms of the service agreement. www.dont-sweat-the-debt.com
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Mar 20, 2013

Andrew Bresalier's answer
There are no citizen requirements to register an entity in Florid, via www.sunbiz.org. www.dont-sweat-the-debt.com
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Mar 28, 2013

Andrew Bresalier's answer
Only a licensed professonal can own part of a Professional Association. Others can staff such an organization.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Dec 13, 2013

Andrew Bresalier's answer
Generally, if it is a small business in County/Small Claims court you can; however, in Circuit Court matters or if the business is not small, counsel is required.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Mar 20, 2013

Natalie F. Guerra-Valdes's answer
You need to make the employee sign non-compete and non-disclosure agreements. It's best to have an attorney draft these agreements for you to make sure that all bases are covered. Many attorneys. such as myself, offer free initial ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Aug 28, 2011

Charles Snyderman's answer
for example - it's an abbreviation for a latin term exempli gratia
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on May 14, 2012

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
If the contract does not provide an answer to your question you should consider having another contract drawn up which does.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Aug 24, 2012

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
Sue the joint venturers. Get an attorney on this immediately. Time is wasting and you need a good mouthpiece to negotiate some sort of resolution.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Sep 5, 2012

Robert Jason De Groot's answer
More facts are needed to answer this question. There are many questions to be asked.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Feb 23, 2012

Francis M. Boyer's answer
You need to check with the Clerk of Courts. Each county has its own rule and also verify that the judge himself does not have his own set of rules too.
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on May 2, 2011

Francis M. Boyer's answer
The liability depends on the acts, or failure to act of that director. Simply put, being a director does not per se, make that director personally liable for the debts of the company. However, there many exceptions to this and a director can be held ...
 
 

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law for Florida on Jul 5, 2011

Francis M. Boyer's answer
Yes and ou should. The statute of limitations is 4 years for an oral contract and 5 years for a written contract.