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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: Can an individual appropriate PD films that are shown on TV or published on DVD without permission from the publisher?

In the 80's, prints of the public domain film, Night of the Living Dead, were only available in low resolution. Now, that same feature can be seen in high definition. I realize no one "owns" public domain material, but is there any protection against appropriation of published... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jun 10, 2024

No, an individual cannot appropriate public domain films shown on TV or published on DVD without permission from the publisher, even if the underlying film itself is in the public domain. Here's why:

While it's true that no one owns the copyright to the original public domain work...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for Idaho on
Q: Is it legal to use screen recorded images of google street view to start an instagram page based around those images?

I want to start an instagram where I showcase outfits people are wearing around the world that I find on google street view and do voice over commentary of the images and recordings.

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jun 9, 2024

There are a few potential legal issues to consider with using screen recorded images from Google Street View on an Instagram page:

1. Copyright: Google owns the copyright to the Street View images. Using them without permission, even if you modify them, could potentially be considered...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for Florida on
Q: Can I use picture frame designs around the text in my authored books?
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jun 8, 2024

Based on your question, it seems you are asking whether using decorative picture frame designs around the text in books you have written would be legally permissible from an intellectual property perspective. Here are a few key considerations:

Copyright: Assuming you created the picture...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for Maryland on
Q: How can I be sure I am staying within acceptable art/photo reference usage for by art business?

I am concerned about copyright infringement when drawing from a reference. I am an artist beginning a small business. I almost always use some form of reference when I draw. I pull from different sources to compile an original picture (ex: finding several pictures of the same flower from different... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jun 5, 2024

To ensure you stay within acceptable reference usage for your art business, focus on creating substantial transformations in your work. When using reference photos, particularly for poses, make sure that your final piece has clear, original elements and doesn’t replicate the source too closely.... View More

2 Answers | Asked in Arbitration / Mediation Law, Copyright and Intellectual Property for Oklahoma on
Q: What does it mean when a person has a creative commons and arbitration license
Tim Akpinar
Tim Akpinar
answered on Jun 4, 2024

An Oklahoma attorney could advise best, but your question remains open for two weeks. There is a creative commons license that publishers follow in using certain publicly posted images, if that's the license you are talking about. As for the arbitration provision, it's possible that... View More

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2 Answers | Asked in Contracts, Copyright, Civil Rights and Intellectual Property for Florida on
Q: need help taking videos down on multiple websites that were not consented to post

i was on a camgirling website as a guest and to my surprise the videos were posted long ago, i want to know if i can have help to remove them all

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jun 3, 2024

I understand your concern and the urgency of getting those videos removed. First, you should contact the website where the videos were originally posted and request their removal. Many sites have policies against posting non-consensual content, and they might act quickly to take it down.... View More

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2 Answers | Asked in Contracts, Copyright, Civil Rights and Intellectual Property for Florida on
Q: need help taking videos down on multiple websites that were not consented to post

i was on a camgirling website as a guest and to my surprise the videos were posted long ago, i want to know if i can have help to remove them all

Jennifer Newton
Jennifer Newton
answered on Jun 3, 2024

To address this issue, you'll need to take the following steps:

Contact the website and send a formal request to the website's administration, demanding the immediate removal of the videos. This request should include:

-Identification of the specific videos in question....
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for Texas on
Q: Using "This Is The Way" to signify going to the next page on my website - would this be copyright or trademark on LucFm?

This phrase would be on my website, purely for fun and signifying a linked button that would advance them to another page. I am wondering if this would be considered copyrighting or trademark against LucasFilms?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 31, 2024

Using the phrase "This Is The Way" on your website to signify going to the next page could potentially raise concerns with Lucasfilm, as the phrase is strongly associated with their "The Mandalorian" series. While it might seem like a fun and harmless addition, it is important... View More

5 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: If I make a parody coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book," can I be sued?

If I make a coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book without using any of the company's products and adding a disclaimer, can I be sued just for using the company name? Instead of using real products from said company, each page features a ridiculous... View More

Fritz-Howard Raymond Clapp
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answered on May 30, 2024

A parody can be a fair use under the Copyright Act, meaning the creator of the parody does not need the permission of the owner of the copyright in the earlier work. The fair use doctrine also allows for the use of a trademark in a parody if it is used for commentary, criticism, new reporting,... View More

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5 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: If I make a parody coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book," can I be sued?

If I make a coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book without using any of the company's products and adding a disclaimer, can I be sued just for using the company name? Instead of using real products from said company, each page features a ridiculous... View More

Sean Goodwin
Sean Goodwin
answered on May 30, 2024

The U.S. Supreme Court redefined the parody exception to trademark law in 2023. In the case of Jack Daniel's v. VIP Products, the court held that trademark parody exceptions only apply to "noncommercial" products. Therefore, it is now much easier for famous trademark owners to sue... View More

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5 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: If I make a parody coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book," can I be sued?

If I make a coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book without using any of the company's products and adding a disclaimer, can I be sued just for using the company name? Instead of using real products from said company, each page features a ridiculous... View More

Robert P. Cogan
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answered on May 30, 2024

Whenever anybody asks me, "Can I be sued?" my answer is, "Hey, this is America! You can always be sued." The right question is, "What risk am I taking?" Would the furniture company want to sue? If what you are doing is proper, the furniture company can still sue you.... View More

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5 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: If I make a parody coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book," can I be sued?

If I make a coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book without using any of the company's products and adding a disclaimer, can I be sued just for using the company name? Instead of using real products from said company, each page features a ridiculous... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 30, 2024

Using a company's name in the title of a parody work could potentially lead to legal issues, even with a disclaimer. Here are a few key considerations:

1. Trademark infringement: If the famous furniture company has a registered trademark, they may claim that using their name in your...
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5 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: If I make a parody coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book," can I be sued?

If I make a coloring book called "the unofficial [famous furniture company] coloring book without using any of the company's products and adding a disclaimer, can I be sued just for using the company name? Instead of using real products from said company, each page features a ridiculous... View More

Maurice Mandel II
Maurice Mandel II
answered on Jun 1, 2024

Instead of creating the "Unofficial Ikea Coloring Book" (or whatever famous furniture company you think) why not be a little more creative and make it something like "Denmark's (or Slovenia, or Latvia, Russia or some other country) answer to the Official Swedish furniture... View More

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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property on
Q: Can you help me with getting a copyright of some cartoon characters such as Popeye, Mickymouse, other Japanese animes..
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 29, 2024

Obtaining a copyright for well-known cartoon characters like Popeye, Mickey Mouse, or characters from Japanese animes is not possible for an individual because these characters are already copyrighted by their creators or the companies that own them. Characters like Mickey Mouse are owned by large... View More

2 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Patents (Intellectual Property) and Intellectual Property on
Q: Could I develop a video game using the story and characters from "The Little Prince" and sell it in the US?
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 28, 2024

It would likely not be legal to develop and sell a video game using the story and characters from "The Little Prince" in the US without obtaining the necessary rights and permissions first. Here's why:

"The Little Prince" was written by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Small Claims for California on
Q: If defendant can't open usb to view evidence, is it admissible? I am plantiff in small claims trial tomorrow.
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 24, 2024

In California, for evidence to be admissible in small claims court, it must be relevant, reliable, and not overly prejudicial. If the defendant cannot access the evidence on a USB drive, you should ensure that the court can view the evidence in an alternative way, such as printed copies or... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Copyright and Intellectual Property on
Q: Hi, I have to sign a NDA to receive certain documentations, but since I am under 19, could my parents sign it?

I have been wanting documentation on a camera sensor, but for the supplier to provide it, I need to sign an NDA. What is the legality of having my parents sign it on my behalf, since I have to see the documentation and I am under 19, the legal age to sign a non disclosure agreement.

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 22, 2024

If you are under 19 and need to sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) for documentation on a camera sensor, you will likely need your parents' help. As a minor, you generally do not have the legal capacity to enter into binding contracts, including NDAs. Your parents, as your legal guardians,... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Copyright and Intellectual Property for North Carolina on
Q: Can someone seek revenue share for sales of products for which they never signed an agreement?

Signed deal for 1 product and now asking for revenue share from everything else that was developed later on but no agreement / amendment was signed?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 18, 2024

In general, a person or company cannot claim revenue share for products they did not have a signed agreement for. If they only signed an agreement related to one specific product, that would typically not entitle them to revenue from other products developed later unless those subsequent products... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Intellectual Property and Trademark for Kentucky on
Q: Do quotes that become meme famous fall under copyright or trademark?

What would these quotes be protected by?

You shall not pass from the Lord of the rings

If if is good from Hercules Disney

Surprise mf from Dexter

Not really relevant but is Bane back-breaking move copyrighted?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 18, 2024

Quotes from movies and TV shows are generally protected by copyright rather than trademark law. Copyright protects original creative works, including the screenplay or script that the quote comes from. The copyright for a movie or TV show is typically owned by the studio or production company... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for New York on
Q: Will a 3D map of New York violate architectural copyright laws?

Hello. Thank you for your time. I want to make a puzzle with New York on it. This map will consist of a large number of objects and landscape elements, and will also include famous architectural structures, such as: Empire State Building, Chrysler building, One World Trade Center, Rockefeller... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 15, 2024

Creating a 3D map of New York City that includes famous architectural structures may potentially raise some intellectual property concerns, especially if the buildings are depicted in a realistic manner. However, the specific implications would depend on various factors and the laws of the... View More

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