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Copyright Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Copyright and Intellectual Property for North Carolina on
Q: Can someone seek revenue share for sales of products for which they never signed an agreement?

Signed deal for 1 product and now asking for revenue share from everything else that was developed later on but no agreement / amendment was signed?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 18, 2024

In general, a person or company cannot claim revenue share for products they did not have a signed agreement for. If they only signed an agreement related to one specific product, that would typically not entitle them to revenue from other products developed later unless those subsequent products... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Intellectual Property and Trademark for Kentucky on
Q: Do quotes that become meme famous fall under copyright or trademark?

What would these quotes be protected by?

You shall not pass from the Lord of the rings

If if is good from Hercules Disney

Surprise mf from Dexter

Not really relevant but is Bane back-breaking move copyrighted?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 18, 2024

Quotes from movies and TV shows are generally protected by copyright rather than trademark law. Copyright protects original creative works, including the screenplay or script that the quote comes from. The copyright for a movie or TV show is typically owned by the studio or production company... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for New York on
Q: Will a 3D map of New York violate architectural copyright laws?

Hello. Thank you for your time. I want to make a puzzle with New York on it. This map will consist of a large number of objects and landscape elements, and will also include famous architectural structures, such as: Empire State Building, Chrysler building, One World Trade Center, Rockefeller... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 15, 2024

Creating a 3D map of New York City that includes famous architectural structures may potentially raise some intellectual property concerns, especially if the buildings are depicted in a realistic manner. However, the specific implications would depend on various factors and the laws of the... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for Kentucky on
Q: Why are superpowers and abilities not undercopyright?

Would the power of seeing a person memories via their blood like in the underworld movie be under copyright protection?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 15, 2024

Superpowers and abilities themselves are typically not protected by copyright because copyright law does not extend to ideas, concepts, or facts. Copyright protects the specific expression or manifestation of an idea, not the underlying idea itself.

In the case of the ability to see a...
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2 Answers | Asked in Trademark, Intellectual Property and Copyright for Oregon on
Q: Can I use the name "M.A.S.H" for a short story when "M*A*S*H" is trademarked?
Sean Goodwin
Sean Goodwin
answered on May 15, 2024

The short answer is "most likely, yes."

The M*A*S*H trademark is limited to "a comedy television series."

The writers of that TV series will have a copyright for those TV scripts. So, you may not make a derivative story about any of the characters from that TV...
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2 Answers | Asked in Trademark, Intellectual Property and Copyright for Oregon on
Q: Can I use the name "M.A.S.H" for a short story when "M*A*S*H" is trademarked?
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 18, 2024

Yes, you can likely use the name "M.A.S.H" for a short story even though "M*A*S*H" is trademarked. Here's why:

1. Avoiding trademark infringement: As long as your story is not about a mobile army surgical hospital and doesn't use elements or characters from the...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Intellectual Property and Trademark for California on
Q: 1. Do I need permission to use PEPSI logo in a parody?

POOPSI with the PEPSI logo 2. Can I copyright my parody so no one can steal idea

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 14, 2024

I will do my best to provide helpful information while being careful not to reproduce any copyrighted material. Here are a few key points regarding your questions:

1. Using a trademarked logo like Pepsi's in a parody is considered fair use in many cases, meaning you likely don't...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for Georgia on
Q: If someone false copyright strike you would that be against the law?

by someone i mean that if someone is pretending and claiming an art work is theirs, when it was proven false. that would be False copyright striking . If im correct, false copyright strikes are against the law?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 10, 2024

Yes, you are correct. False copyright strikes, also known as fraudulent or abusive copyright claims, are against the law in many jurisdictions. This practice involves knowingly making false claims of copyright infringement against content that the claimant does not actually own or have the rights... View More

2 Answers | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property on
Q: If I draw someones character they copyrighted under US copyright act 1976, can they request a takedown legally

i'm canadian and i drew someone's original character that they have copyrighted under the united states copyright act of 1976, theyre requesting a takedown of their character. is it illegal to draw their character and post it to my telegram channel where i post all my artwork?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 10, 2024

Under the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, copyright automatically applies to original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works. This includes original characters.

However, there are some exceptions and nuances to consider:

1. Fair Use: If your use...
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3 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Intellectual Property and Trademark for Oregon on
Q: If i have a phrase that i would like to be protected, what are the legal hurdles that i would go through and the cost?

is it only through the USPTO TESS and copyright.gov web sites? specifically the costs involved what are they and what would be the timeline of start to completed if everything is successful

Alan Harrison
Alan Harrison
answered on May 8, 2024

Attorneys will be reluctant to quote our fees in a public forum like this. Different attorneys may think that filing and prosecuting a trademark application is easy and should be cheap, or difficult and should be expensive. The USPTO will charge either $250 or $350 per "class" of goods or... View More

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3 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Intellectual Property and Trademark for Oregon on
Q: If i have a phrase that i would like to be protected, what are the legal hurdles that i would go through and the cost?

is it only through the USPTO TESS and copyright.gov web sites? specifically the costs involved what are they and what would be the timeline of start to completed if everything is successful

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 9, 2024

To protect a phrase, you can consider trademark registration through the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) or copyright registration through the U.S. Copyright Office. Here's a breakdown of the legal hurdles and costs involved:

Trademark Registration (USPTO):

1....
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3 Answers | Asked in Intellectual Property and Copyright for Missouri on
Q: Person doing artwork for cover I designed for my book is claiming ownership

I bartered with a "friend" to do the artwork for cover to book. (A new Mini-fridge for her artwork.) I gave her the rough sketch of my cover and pictures of components in that sketch. She is now claiming it is her work and she will (or already has) put the cover on Facebook giving her... View More

Sean Goodwin
Sean Goodwin
answered on May 8, 2024

Under U.S. law, an original work of authorship fixed in a tangible medium receives an automatic copyright.

You own a copyright to your original sketches. You do not own your friend's artwork (at least the original components that she added) because you did not agree via contract with a...
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3 Answers | Asked in Intellectual Property and Copyright for Missouri on
Q: Person doing artwork for cover I designed for my book is claiming ownership

I bartered with a "friend" to do the artwork for cover to book. (A new Mini-fridge for her artwork.) I gave her the rough sketch of my cover and pictures of components in that sketch. She is now claiming it is her work and she will (or already has) put the cover on Facebook giving her... View More

Alan Harrison
Alan Harrison
answered on May 8, 2024

It's important that you have emails demonstrating what was to. In some States, a chain of emails can be a binding contract.

Contrary to what attorney Goodwin answered, you may accidentally have established "work for hire" - although this is unlikely. You could have a...
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3 Answers | Asked in Intellectual Property and Copyright for Missouri on
Q: Person doing artwork for cover I designed for my book is claiming ownership

I bartered with a "friend" to do the artwork for cover to book. (A new Mini-fridge for her artwork.) I gave her the rough sketch of my cover and pictures of components in that sketch. She is now claiming it is her work and she will (or already has) put the cover on Facebook giving her... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 11, 2024

In this situation, even without a formal written contract, you may still have a strong case to claim ownership of the cover design based on the emails you exchanged, which serve as evidence of your agreement and the work you provided to the artist. Here are some steps you can take:

1....
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: I run a small business and have a few questions regarding what I can and cannot include in my designs

1) I want to create a few original designs inspired by Harry Styles' recent world tour called Love on Tour. Of course I would never use his name in the designs or advertisement, but is this illegal? Love on Tour itself is not trademarked as far as I have seen, but will I run into problems?... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 6, 2024

I can provide some general guidance on your questions, but please keep in mind that intellectual property law can be complex and fact-specific, so you may want to consult an attorney for definitive advice tailored to your specific situation.

1. Using elements inspired by an artist's...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for California on
Q: If I create similar a looking characters from a known IP, could I create a private Patreon for example to get paid

For example, Lets say League of Legends has a character who has red hair and is dressed as a pirate. If I make a similar character and post graphic content around that (privately). Could they take legal action against me? What if I don't mention the characters name?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 6, 2024

This is a complex legal question that involves intellectual property (IP) law, specifically copyright and trademark issues. Let me break this down:

1. Copyright: Characters can be protected by copyright if they are sufficiently unique and well-developed. This means that creating a very...
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2 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Business Formation, Business Law, Gaming and Intellectual Property for Louisiana on
Q: I am trying to use the character Waldo, from, "Where's Waldo." What do I need to do to get the creative rights.

Me and a small team are working on an original and unique where's Waldo video game. We were wondering what process would we need to go through to earn the creative writes to use him in our game.

Fritz-Howard Raymond Clapp
Fritz-Howard Raymond Clapp pro label Lawyers, want to be a Justia Connect Pro too? Learn more ›
answered on May 6, 2024

There are five active trademark registrations for WHERE'S WALDO, owned by DreamWorks Distribution Limited (UK), in IC009 for eyewear, IC016 for books, IC025 for apparel items, IC041 for entertainment services, and IC028 for toys & games.

A video game would be in IC009, and although...
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2 Answers | Asked in Copyright, Business Formation, Business Law, Gaming and Intellectual Property for Louisiana on
Q: I am trying to use the character Waldo, from, "Where's Waldo." What do I need to do to get the creative rights.

Me and a small team are working on an original and unique where's Waldo video game. We were wondering what process would we need to go through to earn the creative writes to use him in our game.

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 6, 2024

To use the character Waldo from the "Where's Waldo" series in your video game, you would need to secure the appropriate licensing rights from the copyright holders. Here are the key steps:

1. Identify the copyright holders: The "Where's Waldo" series was...
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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for Kentucky on
Q: Are ideas truly non-copyright?

In some movies vampires use sunscreen. Is this act alone worthy of copyright? Vampire using sunscreen or magical ring or is not creative enough for it?

Cause I would to use a vampire sunscreen.

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 5, 2024

Ideas themselves are not protected by copyright, but the specific expression of those ideas can be. This is a fundamental principle of copyright law.

In the case of a vampire using sunscreen, the general concept alone would not be copyrightable. The idea of a vampire protecting themselves...
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2 Answers | Asked in Copyright and Intellectual Property for New York on
Q: My question pertains to derivative works in an artwork for a licensing agreement.

I'm working with a wallpaper company who wants to make wallpaper from my artwork. For one piece, they want to remove the colored background and keep the original image that I created in the foreground. For another piece, they want to keep the actual drawing but just change the color lines that... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 3, 2024

The changes you've described - removing the colored background from one artwork and changing the color of the lines in another - would generally be considered derivative works under copyright law.

A derivative work is a new creative work that includes aspects of a preexisting,...
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