Nevada Immigration Law Questions & Answers

Q: Parents brought me here illegally very young. I just want to know my options.

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law and Education Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jan 11, 2019
Kelli Y Allen's answer
Unfortunately, you are in the situation of a large number of young people who need a change in the immigration laws. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program) applies to your situation, but because of the President's executive order, no new DACA applications are being accepted. This is currently being reviewed by the courts, so there is the possibility that DACA applications will resume. If you hear in the news that has happened, contact an immigration lawyer immediately....

Q: I want to marry a girl from China, we met 3 weeks ago, can I get in trouble doing this ?/

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Dec 12, 2018
Jingzhan Wang's answer
more information is needed. What kind of trouble do you mean?

Q: Can I travel in & out of the US if I lost my green card, or do I need to replace it first?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Aug 17, 2018
Ashley Negrette's answer
If you have a two year green card you should apply to remove the conditions on your residence (Form I-751 if you received your green card through your US Spouse) 90 days before the expiration date on the card. Once that application is approved you will receive a 10 year green card.

You should always have a valid card when you try to re-enter the country. You should contact an attorney for help.

Q: I got advised at the airport, will my green card be in jeopardy when I want to reenter US? I plan to go to Canada.

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jun 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
It depends on the facts of your case. Schedule a legal consultation with an experienced immigration attorney.

Carl Shusterman

www.shusterman.com

Q: 49 yrs living in us since i was 4 wks old. Permanent resident. Birth cert shows father as us citizen. Am i a us citizen?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jun 4, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
You very well may be a US citizen. However, there are a lot questions which need to be answered including: Were your parents married at the time of your birth? Was your father a US citizen at that time? How long had he been physically present in the US prior to your birth? How old were you when you became a permanent resident?

Schedule an appointment with an attorney experienced in derivative citizenship law.

Carl Shusterman

www.shusterman.com

Q: I am a green card holder. What is the fastest way to bring or petition my girlfriend to the U.S.?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jun 2, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
You can sponsor her under the family-based 2A category. The process takes about 2 years. However, if she is eligible for an H-1B professional working visa or an L-1 intracompany transferee, the process is much faster. Also, if you are eligible, you should apply for naturalization asap.

Q: My husband and I are retired Canadian citizens and want to get American residency through our American daughter.

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on May 29, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Yes, you can, but do not apply during your first 90 days in the US.

Q: My niece overstayed visitor visa (since 1993) lives in Nevada, married US citizen what forms to file her greencard?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Apr 23, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
In order to adjust status, you must fill out Form I-485, along with supporting forms and documents. This form is issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, or USCIS.

One of the things you must include with Form I-485 is proof that you are eligible for a green card. In your case, that means proving that you are married, and that your spouse wishes to petition for you. You may have already taken care of both things if your spouse already submitted Form I-130, Petition for Alien...

Q: F1visa married with US citizen. If I want to stop school.Because of can not afford it. Can I apply a green card

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Apr 23, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
You can apply for adjustment of status, and stop going to school.

Good news here if you overstayed a U.S. visa: While most people in your shoes are not eligible to adjust status (and must instead apply for their visa through consular processing, in their home country), your marriage to a U.S. citizen basically cancels out the issue, and you can apply to adjust status no matter how long you were out of status. In fact, you'll be getting a double benefit by doing so, because if you...

Q: Same sex marriage

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Apr 20, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Yes, you can marry her and sponsor her for a green card. However, the procedure can take a couple of years.

Schedule a consultation with an experienced immigration lawyer.

Q: Is it legal to work for two employers (one full time, other part time) on H1B?

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law and Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Apr 20, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Foreign nationals in valid H1B status are eligible to work for multiple H1B employers as long as the additional employer(s) are willing to file a petition for a "Concurrent H1B."

For the benefit of H1B employees who are interested in working with multiple H1B employers, we present here an overview of the Concurrent H1B and the key elements that employers and H1B employees must keep in mind while working in the U.S. under a Concurrent H1B.

Q: Is it legal to work for two employers (one full time, other part time) on H1B?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Apr 20, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
Yes, persons in H-1B status can have concurrent employment.

Foreign nationals in valid H1B status are eligible to work for multiple H1B employers as long as the additional employer(s) are willing to file a petition for a "Concurrent H1B."

For the benefit of H1B employees who are interested in working with multiple H1B employers, we present here an overview of the Concurrent H1B and the key elements that employers and H1B employees must keep in mind while working in the U.S....

Q: Can a F-1 student visa holder (not expired, still in school) apply for a permanent residency?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Apr 9, 2018
Carl Shusterman's answer
You would need to have an employer sponsor you for a green card.

Please see https://www.shusterman.com/greencardsthroughemployment/

Q: Voluntary deportation

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jan 25, 2018
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
We strongly recommend that your mother consult with an immigration attorney. Sounds as if she might be eligible for a U visa for crime victims.

Q: My wife self deported and is barred from reentering the USA. What are our legal course of action?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Dec 11, 2017
Kyndra Mulder's answer
More information is needed to know whether your wife can return to the USA. She may be eligible for a fraud waiver.

Q: Husband & I Just got married. I am currently on DACA and plan to apply for residency. What's the process?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Nov 21, 2017
Matthew J Hartnett's answer
Assuming your husband is a US citizen, I-130, I-601A waiver, consular processing. That is the process. contact attorney to see if you are a good candidate.

Q: Is that possible to an ilegal alien to get a car dealership license or not?

1 Answer | Asked in Business Formation, Business Law, Criminal Law and Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Nov 20, 2017
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
It is hard to say, since that’s more of a state level issue. Assume that it is unlikely, however.

Q: my immigration lawyer wont give me my file until i pay him and its in collection since 2011 what can i do

1 Answer | Asked in Collections, Immigration Law and Consumer Law for Nevada on
Answered on Oct 10, 2017
Ashley Negrette's answer
You should contact the County Bar Association in your area. They have programs that can help settle disputes between attorneys. Each state has different requirements for attorneys so its important to know the rule the applies and then take action accordingly.

Q: Is it possible to obtain a work permit & temporary residence card for work in Poland with a US federal tax lien?

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law, Immigration Law and Tax Law for Nevada on
Answered on Aug 8, 2017
Michelle D. Wynn's answer
I cannot address whether Poland will issue you a work permit, but as far as the IRS goes, it will not prohibit you from living and working in Poland. You should be aware, however, that for as long as you live outside the United States, the statute of limitations on collecting your tax debt stops running. So, while your tax debt would expire at the end of approximately 10 years if you were living here in the US, while you are in Poland it will never expire. There are also special filing...

Q: Help

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jun 14, 2017
Kevin L Dixler's answer
It's probably time to hire a competent and experienced immigration attorney before more complications arise.

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