Nebraska Employment Law Questions & Answers

Q: Who is financially responsible for injuring someone while delivering pizza, driver or employer?

1 Answer | Asked in Personal Injury, Car Accidents and Employment Law for Nebraska on
Answered on Nov 20, 2018
Brendan Michael Kelly's answer
You as the driver are responsible for the accident and the lawyer is likely to come after the pizza place to have them recover as well.

Q: Could I sue my former boss or the bars involved in my accident?

1 Answer | Asked in Personal Injury, Criminal Law and Employment Law for Nebraska on
Answered on Oct 9, 2017
Peter N. Munsing's answer
Contact a member of the Nebraska Assn for Justice who handles workers compensation and employment cases. You may have several potential claims depending on the laws of your state.

Q: Who is responsible for registration tags affixed 60-399 on licence plate of company vehicle driven by employee

1 Answer | Asked in Car Accidents, Employment Law and Traffic Tickets for Nebraska on
Answered on Aug 2, 2017
Brendan Michael Kelly's answer
The owner of the vehicle or the company. Any licensed driver of the vehicle would be held responsible for any violations. The company may later be subjected to civil suit for any violations they subjected an employee to.

Q: Can i sue this company?

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law and Personal Injury for Nebraska on
Answered on Dec 7, 2016
Peter N. Munsing's answer
It may be possible to sue them IF you can show that as a result someone was able to use that information. You say you have "7 different reports I know nothing about." Any lawyer you talk to will want you to find out what they are. They may or may not have anything to do with this.

Stress and anxiety are generally items that the law, in reality, gives little or nothing for. Yes they can be claimed as injuries, but the reality is that neither claims adjusters, judges nor juries give much...

Q: can my employer require me to remove me earrings and cover the visable holes left behind?

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Nebraska on
Answered on Apr 24, 2016
Marshall Jason Ray's answer
Employers have wide discretion when it comes to dress an grooming standards for their employees. The restriction you describe regarding piercings is commonplace and likely to be upheld if subject to a legal challenge. Challenges to employer dress codes are only typically successful if an employee can cite a valid religious objection or if the dress standard is degrading or is indicative or in furtherance of illegal discrimination of some kind.

Q: What liablilty does the employyer have for excon employees

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Nebraska on
Answered on Feb 22, 2012
Ryan P. Sullivan's answer
An employers liability will depend primarily on whether they were aware of the employee's misconduct, whether they failed to take appropriate action necessary to remedy the situation. Under some circumstances, an employer would be liable for damages caused by the conduct of an employee that constitutes sexual harassment of another employee, or subjects that employee to a hostile work environment.

Q: Is it illegal for a supervisor to accept money from an employee in large amounts.

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Nebraska on
Answered on May 13, 2011
Ryan P. Sullivan's answer
It depends on the circumstances, can you elaborate?

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