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Oregon Real Estate Law Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Family Law and Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: My boyfriend and I own a home. I put up the money for it. We are splitting. Do I have any rights to the money or home

I took a loan from my 401k. I want to stay in the house. I don’t know if he will leave.

Vincent J. Bernabei
Vincent J. Bernabei answered on Oct 6, 2021

When an unmarried couple separates, Oregon courts attempt to determine the parties’ intent when deciding whether and how to divide property acquired during the relationship. The key inquiry is whether the parties intended to “pool their resources for their common benefit.”

You...
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1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Divorce for Oregon on
Q: Can my ex-wife move back into our house her name is on the mortgage but not the title and I recently got married again?
Vincent J. Bernabei
Vincent J. Bernabei answered on Oct 4, 2021

Once you are divorced, the court's General Judgment of Dissolution of Marriage is the court order determines your and your former spouse's rights and responsibilities regarding ownership and occupancy of the home and payment of the mortgage. You will have to review your General Judgment... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant and Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: Our landlord was told he was not allowed to contact us during the selling of the property we are living is this true

He was told this by the relastate company representative handling the property.

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Sep 27, 2021

The realtor works for the landlord so they can't tell him anything. Unless the tenant has had a court issue a restraining order against the landlord for some reason, the landlord and tenant are free to communicate however and whenever they wish. If the owner/landlord has hired a property... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: If a rental property does not meet habitability standards at move-in can I legally terminate the lease?
Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Aug 30, 2021

It likely depends upon the extent of the habitability violations. Dripping faucet? Crack in outer window pane? No, your on a lease. Holes in the floor, walls, and ceilings? You probably could get out of the lease. Either way, your main remedy is to force the landlord to repair and comply.

1 Answer | Asked in Consumer Law and Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: Do I need to sign a new lease if they messed up on the original?

I received a notice that my rent was going to be increased on April 30th. I signed a new lease for an entire year. The amount that is stated on the lease is $1,378. Since April they have been billing me $1,462. I called and left them a voicemail yesterday letting them know that they're billing... Read more »

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Aug 12, 2021

If you have a valid fixed term lease, they are stuck and cannot raise your tent until it expires unless there is an unusual clause in your lease allowing for it or unless you voluntarily agree to modify or replace the lease - and why would you?

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Real Estate Law and Tax Law for Oregon on
Q: What is the best way to transfer a secondary residence from an aging father to their children?

We were looking to do a deed transfer, but I had questions of triggering a capital gains tax, or gift tax. I was advised the recipient will inherit the gift giver's tax basis, thus losing the step up in basis at death that would otherwise have occurred, thus creating in most cases a capital... Read more »

Theodore David Vicknair Sr.
Theodore David Vicknair Sr. answered on Jul 25, 2021

Example: father purchased the property for $50,000 in the 80s. His orignial "tax basis" is $50,000. So that if he sells it for $50,001 he has a gain of $1. Now its 2021 and It is now worth $200,000. The built in gain is $150,000.

If he holds onto the property, either as a...
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1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Real Estate Law and Energy, Oil and Gas for Oregon on
Q: Could I Sue my family for not turning over my mother's land and mineral to her children that she inherited after she die

My Grandmother's Mother passed left, which left my grand mother land and mineral. My grandmother passed which My mother then inherited some land and minerals. My mother's brothers and sister decide not to let her children know they inherited land and minerals so the kids never got any... Read more »

Theressa Hollis
Theressa Hollis answered on Jul 7, 2021

It sounds like you have a complicated question with several moving parts. I recommend you bring in all the information you have and meet with an experienced probate attorney who can let you know your rights in this situation.

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: Do all owners need to sign a quitclaim, or just those leaving the claim?

I own a property with my dad and ex-wife. My dad and ex-wife both want to exit ownership through a quitclaim. Can they file quitclaims for themselves or do we all need to sign off on each one?

Anthony M. Avery
Anthony M. Avery answered on Jun 25, 2021

You have not stated the exact Estate that each of you own presently. But most likely one quit claim deed from your Father and ex wife as grantors will place the Fee Simply Title in you. Hire a competent OR attorney to handle this properly.

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law, Landlord - Tenant and Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: We were never asked to buy the property we have been renting for almost 2 years ...

We got a 90 day notice to leave because they sold the property . But no papers were added showing proof of it being sold ...I lease ended in march ..they never renewed it but we have till this day payed rent every month...what should we do...there is nothing open for rent here

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Jun 19, 2021

Much depends upon the exact details - what the 90 day notice said; what, if any, other papers were served; what, if anything, was said about relocation assistance; etc. You are correct that the seller/landlord is obligated to show you a copy of the offer that he accepted, along with a declaration... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: Is a 'Move in fee' allowed in Oregon?

Per ORS 90.295-302, I cannot find anything that outlines this fee as allowable. I moved in to the home in 2011 and moved out last month. My lease outlined a non refundable move in fee that was paid upon move in. This was obviously not refunded to me last month when I moved out. Is this fee allowed?

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on May 27, 2021

One would need to check what law was in effect in 2011 to see if such a fee was lawful then. Even if it was not, there is a one year statute of limitations on landlord-tenant matters BUT depending upon the exact wording in the lease, you may be entitled to treat it like a deposit instead, which... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Litigation, Contracts, Landlord - Tenant and Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: lease renewal letter to accept by end of month then rescinded before that..put on month to month. Eviction coming?

My boyfriend was given a lease renewal letter and told he had til the end end of this month to sign it. Today he received a letter saying that that has been rescinded and it is now going to be month to month. Out of 3 units he was the only one put on month to month and when he asked the landlord he... Read more »

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on May 17, 2021

Had he signed and accepted the offer prior to the rescission, there is likely nothing the landlord could have done. But if he rescinded before your boyfriend accepted the renewed term lease, your boyfriend in now likely going to be on a month to month. But that is not the end of the world - to... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: Bought a house seller won't leave

We just bought a house. We gave the seller an extra 25 days to find a new place. We are now days away from our possession date and she told us that she has not found a new place yet so she won't be out in time. We did not hold any money in escrow. We have to be out of our current home. What... Read more »

Samuel J Pope
Samuel J Pope answered on May 9, 2021

Unfortunately, you have no leverage, because there is not any money in escrow. You should probably speak to a lawyer and move forward with eviction or whatever that lawyer suggests.

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: Seller of a rented home wants the buyer to take over as tenant 30 days after closing. What can new owners do to renters?

Seller says a 90 day notice to vacate will be given once the house closes. I don't think the renters are paying rent but I am not sure. Is there anyway to get them to vacate by offering money to leave the rental once we take ownership without having to go through an eviction? How long could we... Read more »

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on May 3, 2021

Sure - anything (more or less) that you and the tenants can agree to is likely to work - bribery has long proven an effective way to accomplish some goals. BUT if you are the buyer, with all due respect, you are crazy if you don't make the seller getting the tenants out (instead of you) as a... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: I received a 90 day notice - LL wants to sell - via text. I'm current on rent & lease ends in Nov. Can they do this?

I am worried about finding a new rental in this current market within 90 days. Does the notice have to be mailed or hand delivered? Also, is wanting to sell a justified reason for an early termination within the pandemic? Would they have to pay any moving costs or penalties? Any advice would... Read more »

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Mar 23, 2021

Much depends upon where your dwelling is located and how long you have resided there. That said, email or text is never a lawful means of serving a tenant a termination of tenancy notice and is most likely unenforceable. I interpret your posting to mean that you have a fixed term lease through... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: In Oregon do I have to wait for my rental to sell before I can ask owner for moving expenses during this pandemic?

I was notified our rental is being put on the market to be sold. Once sold, I may be given 90 days to move. At what point, if any, would The property owner be liable to pay for moving expenses? I read it could be up to one months rent. We are in a pandemic and rentals are scarce so if I have an... Read more »

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Mar 21, 2021

If you are not within the Portland city limits, and your landlord (not just property manager) owns 5 or more rental units in Oregon, then you will likely be entitled to receive one month's rent as relocation assistance with receipt of a valid 90 day Notice of Termination of Tenancy. If within... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: What are my rights as an unauthorized occupant/squatter in Oregon?

A year ago, I moved in with my cousin and my parents. My cousin and dad are on the lease; my mom and I are not. My cousin has had issues with my parents and has been threatening to kick them out for months for no reason. I finally stepped in to defend them, and now he’s trying to kick me out too.... Read more »

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Mar 12, 2021

Who issued this notice - the cousin or the master landlord? Do you pay any rent and if so, to whom - cousin or landlord? Depending upon the exact facts, the cousin may have no legal right to terminate anyone else's tenancy. Even if he does, the notice has to contain all the legally required... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: We are In the process of purchasing a home with renters who don’t want to leave

Current owner has served them a 90 day termination notice. Our realtor is saying that at the 90 day mark they can be removed by the sheriff if they haven’t voluntarily left yet. Is this true? Or would we have to wait the 90 days and then the current owner file for eviction proceedings?

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Feb 28, 2021

I hope your realtor knows more about real estate than he does about landlord-tenant law. IF the current owner served a lawfully worded 90 day Notice, and lawfully served it, and the tenants don't leave, then the current owner will have to go to court to evict them - and that could take awhile... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for Oregon on
Q: My roommate and I own a home in oregon. Who decides if additional people move in

The home has no mortgage. I have a child. We all live in the home. We were in a long-term relationship but aren't anymore. He wants his new girlfriend and her son to move in

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Feb 24, 2021

I assume you own the home as tenants in common. Any owner has the right to invite others to occupy the unit, so either of you can. If you can't even agree on co-occupants, perhaps being co-owners was not the wisest choice.

1 Answer | Asked in Consumer Law, Contracts, Real Estate Law and Insurance Bad Faith for Oregon on
Q: My basement has had previous flood damage that was hidden from us and not found on inspection, do i have legal recourse?

My basement recently flooded from a sump pump that failed during a rain storm. After calling the insurance company and having them send ServPro out to assess the damage we discovered that there was previous flood damage and mold growing inside the walls. Insurance says they wont cover it because... Read more »

Tim Akpinar
Tim Akpinar answered on Feb 10, 2021

An Oregon attorney could advise best, as obligations to disclose can differ according to state law. But your question remains open for two weeks. As as GENERAL premise of contract law, taking affirmative steps to hide a condition that was known could be bad faith (e.g. applying thick coatings in a... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant and Real Estate Law for Oregon on
Q: My tenant broke his lease, but paid the remaining 3 months rent left on his lease. Am I now allowed to rent the house?

I heard you’re not allowed to rent your house before the original lease expires (because you’d essentially be getting double rent). But the former tenant broke the lease of his own choice and paid the remaining rent of his own choice too. Must I keep my house vacant for 3 months?

Gregory L Abbott
Gregory L Abbott answered on Feb 2, 2021

As long as it is clear that the tenant has abandoned or otherwise terminated his tenancy, you are free to re-assume possession and rent it out. IF you rent it out prior to the remaining three months on the ex-tenant's lease, and for which you have been paid in full, you must refund to the... Read more »

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