South Carolina Military Law Questions & Answers

Q: Are we in Admiralty law or common law. Cause our flags in our court room are gold fringed meaning Admiralty law

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Admiralty / Maritime, Constitutional Law and Military Law for South Carolina on
Answered on Jan 24, 2019
Timur Akpinar's answer
Courts today can apply elements of both types of law. It will come down to a matter of the type of case the court has subject matter jurisdiction over, so that if a federal district court is deemed to have admiralty jurisdiction over a matter, it will apply maritime law and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. However, our legal system does also embody common law, the notion of applying precedents established from earlier court decisions.

Tim Akpinar

Q: I have been in the military for 20 years got a misdemeanor cdv in 1994 and it was pardoned in 2003 due to going to Iraq.

1 Answer | Asked in Military Law, Civil Rights and Criminal Law for South Carolina on
Answered on May 20, 2017
Robert Donald Gifford II's answer
The Pardon wipes away your conviction and you should be fine to have a concealed permit. I would recommend that you keep copies of your pardon paperwork in multiple places in the event it becomes an issue as to whether or not you have had your rights restored.

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