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Elder Law Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law, Employment Law and Nursing Home Abuse for Oregon on
Q: Can my boss (adult foster home) ask me to work 7 consecutive 24 hour shifts?

She owns 3 other adult foster homes and is very understaffed, she has asked me to work 7 consecutive 24 hour shifts I do get to sleep during the night though. I get paid $200 per 24 hour shift and while I would just quit there would be no one to cover my shifts and I can’t leave the residents... Read more »

Kyle Anderson
Kyle Anderson answered on Sep 23, 2020

Hi, she can ask you to do that, yes. I think there is a minimum wage issue here that you may not realize. $200 divided by 24 hours = $8.33 per hour. It looks like Washington state's minimum wage is $12.00 per hour. I would reach out to an employment law attorney for a consultation if you are... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Elder Law for Oklahoma on
Q: I have durable power of attorney n idk what happens to house or what to do when she is completely irrational

Idk what to do. N I feel bad cus I promised I would never put her like in a nursing home but i don't know what to do. She has pushed her friends away n has gotten very cruel n mean to me...idk what I do cus I never imagined this happening.

Ilana Sharpe
Ilana Sharpe answered on Sep 23, 2020

I'm not certain exactly what the question is here so I will try and answer this generally. There are different types of durable powers. A general durable power gives you the right to make financial decisions for another person at any time whereas a springing durable power would only allow you... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Texas on
Q: Do Elder Law attorneys deal with financial and isolation abuse of an elderly family member?

If I have these suspicions, should the police get involved first, or should I consult with an attorney first? I no longer have access to current financial records and the elderly woman would probably deny any abuse.

Terry Lynn Garrett
Terry Lynn Garrett answered on Sep 21, 2020

You can make an online report to Adult Protective Services. You can also find an elder lawyer near you on the website of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (www.naela.org).

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Elder Law for Maryland on
Q: My uncle is almost legally blind and my aunt has early onset Alzheimer’s but presents well, can their daughter get POA?
Marie-Yves Nadine Jean-Baptiste
Marie-Yves Nadine Jean-Baptiste answered on Sep 21, 2020

Unfortunately, that would not be a good idea and may create a whole host of problems down the line. You are better off petitioning the court for guardianship.

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Texas on
Q: Will I still need P.O.A before the ladybird deed or will either of them work? Do they need to be submitted thru court?

Can the forms be notarized or will they both be submitted through courts?

Terry Lynn Garrett
Terry Lynn Garrett answered on Sep 20, 2020

These documents serve entirely different functions.

A Durable Power of Attorney shares authority over the property of the person who signs it while she is alive. Both her signature and that of her agent must be notarized. If it is to affect real property, it must be recorded in the county...
Read more »

2 Answers | Asked in Employment Law, Elder Law and Nursing Home Abuse for California on
Q: Can I get fired/sued for alleged "conflict of interest" and/or "elderly abuse" for leasing resident's vacant home?

I'm a caregiver in an assisted living facility. Back in July 2020, one of the residents (in her 80's) mentioned about her vacant home and asked me if I wanted to lease it. I answered yes but told her my current lease ends November 30, 2020. She said her friend (her trust administrator)... Read more »

Maurice Mandel II
Maurice Mandel II answered on Sep 19, 2020

Because of your position as a caregiver, any transaction that you have with one of your charges will have, at least, an "appearance" of impropriety or overreaching by you. This is whether the transaction is in fact, disadvantageous to the charge or not. On the other hand, if you are... Read more »

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1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law and Nursing Home Abuse for Maryland on
Q: I have documentation that some nursing homes if not all do not refund to the residents, overpayments of their private

pay for room and board and nursing services when admitted to a hospital, 3 days or longer, or in an associated Rehabilitation medical facility which is paid by Medicare. In other words, Medicare and or Medicaid pay for the resident's room and board and other covered services by Medicare paid... Read more »

Marie-Yves Nadine Jean-Baptiste
Marie-Yves Nadine Jean-Baptiste answered on Sep 18, 2020

Sounds like both. You may need to report this to both agencies.

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law, Health Care Law and Landlord - Tenant for New York on
Q: When an adult relative moves into my rent-stabilized unit, what do I say if the landlord asks how long they'll be here?

I'm an age 72 disabled senior who has lived in my rent-stabilized apartment In NYC for over 30 years. Before Covid, I rented my second bedroom to college students from Japan to defray my monthly expenses. I have built up rent arrears this year because I've not been able to rent to foreign... Read more »

Elaine Shay
Elaine Shay answered on Sep 15, 2020

The landlord appears to have no basis to ask you how long your new housemate may be staying with you. In NYC you are entitled to have a roommate even without your landlord's permission. Although the landlord may have inquired because of the Covid-19 crisis, it is perhaps even more likely you... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Elder Law for Kentucky on
Q: How can I force my parents POA to share their financial records with me and other siblings in KY?
Timothy Denison
Timothy Denison answered on Sep 14, 2020

Short of a lawsuit against the POA, nothing you can do.

2 Answers | Asked in Real Estate Law, Elder Law and Landlord - Tenant for Florida on
Q: In my lease, I don't have a max occupancy but the landlord won't allow my elderly mother to move in. Is this legal?
Barry W. Kaufman
Barry W. Kaufman answered on Sep 10, 2020

It depends upon how many people live there and how many bedrooms there are. Also, if he requires her to be on the lease and she or you is refusing to put her on the lease, he can refuse on that basis as well.

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1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Elder Law for Arizona on
Q: What is " Power of Attorney " for?

Well what rights does that give you ? An under what what kind of circumstances would it be used for?

Ryan K Hodges
Ryan K Hodges answered on Sep 8, 2020

"Power of Attorney" is a term commonly used for a legal arrangement where one person (the principal) gives legal authority to another person (the agent) to make certain decisions or to do certain acts on behalf of the principal. A power of attorney can be general to cover many... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for California on
Q: No POA but my name is on my moms lease. She no longer has capacity, but mgmt changed locks & my moms keys don't work.

In Northern Calif. My name is on her lease for emergency, next of kin, and also it grants me access to her apt if & when needed. She gave me her keys. She has taken a turn for the worse. I need to clear out her apt, but mgmt won't let me in unless they get paperwork showing my mom... Read more »

Maurice Mandel II
Maurice Mandel II answered on Sep 4, 2020

Best wishes to your mom. Start with getting a letter from her M.D. stating that she has suffered a stroke, is suffering from COVID and cannot make decisions for herself. They probably want to cover their asses rather than cause you grief. I assume that you do not have a Health Care POA. You... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law, Estate Planning, Probate and Real Estate Law for North Carolina on
Q: Can older sister step in and take over half my house since mom is on the deed as borrower when and if mom dies.
Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Sep 4, 2020

Being on the deed and being a borrower on the mortgage are two different things. Being on the mortgage is irrelevant but if your mom is on the deed to your house and she leaves her portion of the house to your sister in a will or dies without a will - then yes, it is possible you will sharing the... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Elder Law for North Carolina on
Q: Will NY accept an adult general guardianship from NC?

My mom lives in a nursing home here in NC with advance dementia. I need to get guardianship to conclude her business in NYC? Will NY state accept it if I am deemed her guardian here in NC?

Mr. Albert Loch Saslow
Mr. Albert Loch Saslow answered on Sep 4, 2020

I think many (if not all) of my fellow NC attorneys would be hesitant to answer this question as it seems to involve New York law. You should probably re-submit your question in the NY area of this site.

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law, Elder Law, Estate Planning and Probate for Nebraska on
Q: What are the steps to getting your name added to a house title in Lincoln Nebraska? Brother had mom's name removed.

My dad passed, my brother removed mom's name so he's the only person on the title. My mother is elderly and she said she didn't know. I was never consulted and found out by looking at the county records. My bother said I can be put on the title but I don't know where to start.

Julie Fowler
Julie Fowler answered on Sep 4, 2020

If you are implying that there may have been some type of fraud in removing the mother's name and adding the brother's name to the title, then that needs to be looked into and corrected if necessary first before participating in the brother's willingness to add another name to the... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law, Estate Planning and Probate for North Carolina on
Q: I live in nc my oldest sister s.c became gravely ill and passed spouse did not notify us including 85 yr father .lawsuit

We found out by a outsider .her spouse blocked us from calling.this was 07/2020

No one yet has yet to even call our father can we sue

Mr. Albert Loch Saslow
Mr. Albert Loch Saslow answered on Sep 1, 2020

Just making sure I understand the question: are you asking if you can sue your brother-in-law for failing to inform you that your sister was ill and later died?

Well, you can sue anyone for anything, even if the lawsuit is frivolous and has no chance of success. But I don't see how...
Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law and Consumer Law for Florida on
Q: In a proposal for a new roof purchase for my home I see a clause stating I agree to give up my right to trial by jury.

Concerning my roof purchase would a trial by jury be preferable to going in front of one educated person , The Judge?

I'm assuming if I won't agree to this obnoxious request they won't sell me a new roof. Is this even legal ?

Tim Akpinar
Tim Akpinar answered on Aug 31, 2020

A Florida attorney could answer best, but your post remains open for two weeks. As a GENERAL matter, contracts do contain clauses that dictate how disputes will be resolved. Some of these stipulate that arbitration will be used as a forum instead of civil court. I'm not certain if your clause... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Civil Rights, Elder Law and Probate for New Jersey on
Q: Do lawyers have access to court audios?

Are attorneys able to get an audio of a court hearing that they're involved in fairly quickly?

Andrew M Shaw
Andrew M Shaw answered on Aug 31, 2020

Yes, absolutely. For a $10 fee, it is quite simple to obtain audio of a Court proceeding. The audio file is usually provided by the Court within a couple days.

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Elder Law and Probate for Texas on
Q: Mother was diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2015.

Mother was diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2015. Sister has Mother. I was joint Power of Attorney and in Trust for 50 percent estate. In 2019, sister took Mother to a doctor (after Mother's MD in Tucson already said Mother was unable to make financial decisions in 2018) and had me removed... Read more »

Terry Lynn Garrett
Terry Lynn Garrett answered on Aug 29, 2020

Only your mother can remove you as her agent under a Durable Power of Attorney. Depending on what the trust declaration says, it may be that only she can remove you as co-trustee.

In Texas, anyone who would be a beneficiary under a Will, an heir if there were no Will, or can convince the...
Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for California on
Q: Is there legal recourse to see, visit, and speak with an aging parent (87yr) who is being isolated by one family member?

My sister removed mother from senior living without notification, blocked my number, won’t let my mother see me, speak to me. I believe she is isolating her and then leaving her alone just to cash her social security. She claims COVID-19, but this started before and my mother has been seen in... Read more »

Maurice Mandel II
Maurice Mandel II answered on Aug 21, 2020

First, this is not really Family Law, it is Conservatorship/ Elder abuse law, and you need to repost so those attorneys get an email showing this question. IMO you need to file for a Conservatorship of your mom. You can search for an attorney that deals in Conservatorship/Guardianship on this... Read more »

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