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District of Columbia Landlord - Tenant Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: Habitual Lateness

My landlord have been accepting my late fees and rent late from day one. Can my landlord evict me out

Ali Shahrestani, Esq.
Ali Shahrestani, Esq. answered on Dec 26, 2018

Failure to timely pay rent can be a basis for eviction. Why not pay on time? Are you being evicted? More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney such as myself. You can read more about me, my... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant and Small Claims for District of Columbia on
Q: My AC unit hasn't worked for 2yrs. New owners say they do not supply ac units. But in the past 2yrs my rent as gone up.

Can I recoup the amt of the rent increase? 2yrs worth.

Andrellos Mitchell
Andrellos Mitchell answered on Jun 26, 2018

If I understand your very limited facts correctly...I would ask, Why would a new landlord pay for something that an old landlord did or did not do?

1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: How do I get assistance with upstairs neighbor that is dropping heavy items, slamming doors and walking back and forth?

Condo building/tenant is renting/ was not vetted by board /not able to sleep through the night because sleep is constantly interrupted.

Richard Sternberg
Richard Sternberg answered on Oct 8, 2017

1. Walk upstairs, introduce yourself, and then politely discuss the problem assuming they don’t know they are disturbing you;

2. Get a lawyer to review all your condo docs to find all possible violations, and lay out a game plan to get rid of him:

3. Get a sound meter and...
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1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: Can the renters of the place I am buying get my agents license revoked because I (the buyer ) contacted them?

I am buying a place in DC. The renters have already signed their topa rights away. However i need them to sign the notice to vacate so my bank can move forward. They are supposed to be out the 30th of june. 2 days from now and have agreed. I also went to back to the place to show my GF and the... Read more »

Richard Sternberg
Richard Sternberg answered on Jun 28, 2017

No. You talking to a tenant is not grounds for revocation of your realtor's license. But, it does sound like you need a lawyer in your corner to make things go smoother.

2 Answers | Asked in Real Estate Law and Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: Is it possible to sue a neighbor anonymously?

I am a homeowner in an "unsavory" area of Washington DC. A few houses down from where I live, there is an apartment building where the residents (and their visitors) keep noise outside of the building at all hours of the night. It is disturbing my sleep and the police do nothing when called. I have... Read more »

Richard Sternberg
Richard Sternberg answered on Jun 21, 2017

As a theoretical matter, no. As a practical matter, again, no. But, if you are rich enough and committed enough, maybe. You might act through others in forming a neighborhood association in which you'd really be the anonymous donor, but would appear to be a mere member. The association would sue.... Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Consumer Law, Personal Injury, Civil Rights and Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: What type of offense is it?

My Building manager threatened me in the receptionist's presence, "You don't pay rent. I will get you kicked out. I will call the cops on you." He was not aware that I had cleared my dues except for $1000.

Peter N. Munsing
Peter N. Munsing answered on Jun 1, 2017

As far as calling the cops it's probably a misdemeanor. Otherwise "I will get you kicked out" is ....bad management. You can complain to the owners but they may not care.

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1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: My tenant hasn't paid his rent for two months. When can I start eviction proceedings?
Ali Shahrestani, Esq.
Ali Shahrestani, Esq. answered on May 30, 2017

Now. More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me, my credentials, awards, honors, testimonials, and media appearances/ publications on my law practice website, www.AEesq.com.... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: Can I make my landlord help me pay my water bill?

I contacted my landlord Jan. 18 and ask if she could have maintenance come look at my toilet because it keeps running she then tells me oh I was meaning to call you because D.C. Water called me and said it was an increase in the water usage I was upset but I didn't saying anything at the time I... Read more »

Ali Shahrestani, Esq.
Ali Shahrestani, Esq. answered on Feb 14, 2017

How did your landlord cause this problem? That's not clear. More details are necessary to provide a professional analysis of your issue. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me, my credentials, awards, honors, testimonials, and media appearances/... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: Hello, I live in Washington, DC and my lease expires at the end of January. Can I prorate for if I stay past 1/31/17?

My new place will not let me move in until February 1. Can I prorate a few days rent. My landlord is trying to may me pay for the full month of February. Is this legal?

Ali Shahrestani, Esq.
Ali Shahrestani, Esq. answered on Jan 9, 2017

It depends on the terms of your lease. Some leases require 30 days notice and require that any move-out date occur on the first of the month. You can try negotiating through counsel with your landlord re: pro-ration. An attorney should review your lease. The best first step is an Initial... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: What will happen when i go to landlord and tenat court for the first time as a tenant for eviction in Washington dc
Ali Shahrestani, Esq.
Ali Shahrestani, Esq. answered on Dec 15, 2016

I recommend you access self-help books on eviction law at the local law library.

See: http://ota.dc.gov/page/guide-eviction

The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me on my law practice website. This answer does not constitute legal...
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1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant for District of Columbia on
Q: My landlord has issued policy changes regarding roommates that affect all residents without prior notice. Is this legal?

I live in Washington DC and the changes were made two months after I signed the contract with the apartment building so it’s almost like I was signed into a list of additional stipulations that I wasn’t aware of at the very beginning of my tenancy.

Ali Shahrestani, Esq.
Ali Shahrestani, Esq. answered on Dec 7, 2016

That sounds illegal to me, but it depends on the terms of the rental agreement you signed, and whether the changes were instituted due to requirements of new laws. The best first step is an Initial Consultation with an Attorney. You can read more about me on my law practice website. This answer... Read more »

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