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Ohio Elder Law Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Real Estate Law and Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: If I go 50/50 on a house with my parents and they pay the mortgage to me as rent, could Medicaid put a lien on it?

My parents are in their 70s and my father isn't in the best health.

Andrew Popp
Andrew Popp answered on Oct 12, 2021

You're walking a fine line here. Ohio Medicaid presumes that transfers to family members are "improper" under the Medicaid rules. The burden is on you to prove otherwise.

Issue 1: Could Medicaid put a lien on the house? - It depends on how title to the home is held. If...
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1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: Can I call 911 from outside a nursing home to pick up my dad
Matthew Williams
Matthew Williams answered on Oct 5, 2021

Anyone can call 911 for any reason. Whether they will remove your dad from the nursing home depends upon whether they discover a problem when they arrive.

2 Answers | Asked in Elder Law and Real Estate Law for Ohio on
Q: My mother and I own a home jointly with a survivorship. My mother passed away, Can medicaid take my home?
Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Sep 14, 2021

Medicaid could put a lien on half of the house in order to recoup any funds they paid on behalf of your mother. This is assuming she was in a nursing home or received nursing home waiver services or received Medicaid benefits after age 55.

However, if you took care of your mother for 2...
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2 Answers | Asked in Estate Planning and Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: When someone passes and there is no TOD or Will stating who a vehicle can go to.

Does the Ohio rule of Descent and Distribution, code 2105.06 mean that it will automatically go to the living spouse without having to go thru probate? The same does not apply to lineal descendants such as a child, correct?

Thank you Andrew Popp for your previous help.

Andrew Popp
Andrew Popp answered on Sep 13, 2021

No problem. There is a separate statute for that. See Section 2106.18 of the Ohio Revised Code. (link below) You can usually accomplish this by going to the BMV as long as the value does not exceed $65,000 under current law.

https://codes.ohio.gov/ohio-revised-code/section-2106.18

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1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning and Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: If a married Sr Citizen passes & they have a vehicle only titled in their name.Can it be retitled in someone else's name

Other then the living spouse? The living spouse is 82 and may need state assistance in the future. We don't want her to get refused assistance by not selling the van for money. Her son would like the van transferred to him. She's disabled and he's living with her to help now. So can... Read more »

Andrew Popp
Andrew Popp answered on Sep 13, 2021

Unless there was a TOD on file for the vehicle, then it will require probate in order to transfer the title to the van. The vehicle will be transferred to whomever is named in the Will, or whom is required under Ohio's rule of descent and distribution if there is no Will. See Section 2105.06... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law and Probate for Ohio on
Q: My Father passed away last year after a long stay in a nursing home in Ohio. What do I do with his truck?

The only thing that would go through probate if I were to file would be his truck. No other assets. His wife is deceased. House was foreclosed on. Bank account empty. There is no will. If I were to file in Probate Court as a Small Estate, and notify Medicaid in the process, would they come after... Read more »

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Aug 4, 2021

If the truck is worth less than $5,000 and you paid for the funeral and the funeral cost more than the value of the truck, then you can file for a Summary Release from Administration and Medicaid does not need to be informed or paid back.

2 Answers | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: Can copies of durable powers of attorney be notarized? An attachment made to it? Originals lost.

My parents lost their original notarized copies of powers of attorney, naming myself as able to take care of finances, etc. They are both in assisted living, both with dementia, but able to still sign and converse. I have copies of the originals, is there a way to notarize these somehow? Add a... Read more »

Andrew Popp
Andrew Popp answered on Jul 29, 2021

That's an interesting question. You are essentially trying to have a new POA created with the same terms as the old POA. As phrased, the answer is probably no, but there may be ways around it. Keep in mind that you shouldn't need the original POA when acting for your parents for most... Read more »

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1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: My mother is disabled on SSI can my brother move in and take care of her .
Andrew Popp
Andrew Popp answered on May 24, 2021

Yes. I'm not sure of your exact question. Are you concerned about her losing benefits? Residence issues? In some cases, him moving in can have numerous benefits regarding preserving her estate. I recommend sitting down with an experienced estate planning attorney to review the situation in... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: Do I file a claim for a whole life ins. policy that was owned by my stepmother who was receiving Medicaid assistance?

My stepmother was in a nursing home which was partially paid for by Medicaid. She recently passed away. She had a small whole life insurance policy (under $10,000) that the social worker knew about when they helped her apply for Medicaid assistance. The policy value was over $8000 at the time.... Read more »

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Apr 22, 2021

Life insurance proceeds are exempt from Ohio Medicaid Estate Recovery, if payable to an individual beneficiary.

2 Answers | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: IF WE SIGN OVER OUR HOME TO THE CHILDREN AND ONE IS SUED FOR SOMETHING CAN THE HOUSE BE TAKEN AWAY?

HOW WOULD YOU PREVENT THAT FROM HAPPENING? THERE ARE SIX CHILDREN WANT TO SIGN THEM ALL ON SO IT WOULD BE EQUAL. THEY ARE THE BENEFICIARIES IF WE DIE BUT WANT THEM TO HAVE THE HOME IN THEIR NAME UNTIL WE DO. DO THEY ALL HAVE TO SIGN IN PERSON? OR SEND IT IN. SEVERAL LIVE A GOOD DISTANCE. WHAT ARE... Read more »

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Apr 18, 2021

It would probably make sense to put the house into a trust in order to avoid some of these issues.

Depending on your goals, it might be a revocable trust or it might be an irrevocable trust.

You should definitely consult with an attorney for this before doing anything.

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1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law and Health Care Law for Ohio on
Q: My wife and I are currently helping her ex mother in law with caring for her house hold duties. Can we get traspassed

She is in a assisted living home. We have never caused any trouble or had the police called for doing anything wrong. We are there maybe 3 days a weeks for 2 hours that’s it. How can the property manager do this. She’s scared of the landlord and the landlord is a female. The landlord comes... Read more »

Andrew Popp
Andrew Popp answered on Mar 24, 2021

The short answer is probably yes. You may be able to contest the grounds for the trespass with the parent company who owns the nursing home, however. Ultimately, it may be better to move your ex-mother-in-law to another facility. For a more detailed answer I recommend sitting down with an... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law and Probate for Ohio on
Q: My dad died in OH. He was in a home paid for by Medicare. His home was sold in a tax sale. Is the Medicare lien expired

He died in 2008. His home was sold in a tax sale and Medicare was paid very little. We recently were informed by a distant relative that he is part owner of a property left by another relative in another state and they want to sell. Will we need to pay the Medicare lien with the sale of that... Read more »

Nina Whitehurst
Nina Whitehurst answered on Dec 17, 2020

Medicare does not pursue estate recovery for benefits paid. It is considered an “entitlement” benefit that is earned by taxes paid during working years and premiums paid after enrollment.

2 Answers | Asked in Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law and Probate for Ohio on
Q: I am the co- owner of my mother's banking & checking account. Do I have to pay back my mother's estate ?

My sister placed my Mom into a nursing home in May of 2019 for dementia. And then she hired a guardian for my mom in June 2019. I have lived in my Mom's home from May 2019 until now. I have been the co-owner of my Mom's banking and checking account since April 5, 2015. And, I used the... Read more »

Aaron Epling
Aaron Epling answered on Dec 2, 2020

Interesting question. You certainly cannot be responsible for repaying any money that you spent on behalf of your mother for her expenses like medical expenses, nursing home bills, taxes, insurance, etc. One tricky question is whether you are liable to the estate for payments that you made to... Read more »

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1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Family Law, Real Estate Law and Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: My Dad is 89 years old and for the last 3 or 4 years he has been giving my brothers and mine Inheritances away to his

My Dad is 89 years old and for the last 3 or 4 years he has been giving my brothers and mine Inheritances away to his girlfriends kids, how can we stop this? My Dad telling me that we will not get anything or only get what he owe on. What can be done? My Dad lives in Ohio.

Aaron Epling
Aaron Epling answered on Nov 10, 2020

If he is incompetent, then you can apply to be his guardian and take control over his finances. You could also notify his bank that you believe he's incompetent or under undue influence. If he's competent and not under undue influence, then your options are very limited.

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law and Health Care Law for Ohio on
Q: How to become spouses power of attorney

Spouse in Nursing home due to stroke

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Oct 23, 2020

If she is able to sign her name and is aware of what she is doing, then she can sign a power of attorney form that grants you power of attorney.

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Litigation, Real Estate Law, Elder Law and Landlord - Tenant for Ohio on
Q: Any options to break a lease who can no longer stay independent due to falls, hospitalizations, etc?

After renewing her lease, my mom fell and was hospitalized and spent 4 months in rehabilitation therapy and is now in assisted living facility. Moved her stuff out and notified property manager of the situation via email and offered to work with them on scheduling and key return while moving her... Read more »

Joseph Jaap
Joseph Jaap answered on Oct 1, 2020

No, that does not give an option to break the lease. Tenant is responsible for the rent for the full term of the lease until its expiration. If rent is not paid, landlord can sue for the rent, minus any rent landlord collects from a new tenant.

1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: Can a POA change will&set up irrevocable trust?Does person need to be deemed incompetent for POA to go in effect?
Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Jul 30, 2020

A POA can't make a will.

A POA document must have very specific statutory language in it in order to allow a POA to create an Irrevocable Trust.

Some POA documents require the Principal to be declared incompetent, but many do not.

2 Answers | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: My 89 year old mother is in rehab after she was in Parma UH Geriatric Psyc Ward. Diagnosed with Dementia w/Psychosis.

What are my next steps I do not have financial POA. I have Medical POA

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on Jun 2, 2020

You will need to hire an attorney and apply for guardianship over your mother's financial affairs in probate court.

You can make medical decisions for her now, since you are the Healthcare POA.

However, without either a guardianship or a financial POA, you won't be able to...
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2 Answers | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: My mother in law is financial and legal power of attorney of her aunt who has a substantial savings.

She is a joint account holder with her aunt. Her aunt has a will but has not named an executor. Upon her passing, will the money in her accounts go to probate or will it go to the joint account holder (mother in law)?

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on May 21, 2020

It would go to the joint account holder, if the official account paperwork says that both account owners have "rights of survivorship."

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1 Answer | Asked in Elder Law for Ohio on
Q: It was recently brought to my attention that my elderly dying neighbor has changed her sole heir and sole poa.

There are red flags and suspicions that Live-in Caregiver may have manipulated her into these decisions. As a life long neighbor, I am deeply concerned. My neighbor is incoherent on her deathbed and has no family. How can I anonymously help before it is too late?

Moshe Toron Esq
Moshe Toron Esq answered on May 3, 2020

This is a tough one. There is a lot to really think about and it is difficult to address over the internet.

At the very least, you can call your county Adult Protective Services and see if they want to get involved. However, it is a slow moving process.

Another possibility is for...
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