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North Carolina Juvenile Law Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: Can my mom prohibit me to see my boyfriend? I'm 16 and he is 17 and we are going to have a baby.

My mom said that she won't allow me to see my boyfriend. And I'm specting on April. She sign that she will be responsible for the payments on the hospital. But now she is saying that she won't pay anything. She have me lock down in my house. She don't allow me to go anywhere but school. And she is... Read more »

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Jan 13, 2018

Yes, she can. She likely should have put you on lock down before you got pregnant. But she doesn't get the best of both world's. If she's going to now try and treat you like the child you are - she has to pay for it. Children don't pay for rent and food or hospital bills. And the opposite is... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: NCmy 17 year old girl is getting ready to runaway. with her boyfriend. how can i protect myself if im liable

It seems like a contradiction..they can run away at 17 but I'm liable still?

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Jan 13, 2018

Protect yourself? You should be more concerned about protecting your 17 year old. 17 years olds are not magically allowed to run away unless you are the one foolishly allowing it (in which case - you ought to be liable). They are not allowed to run away until 18 and at that point you are not... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Civil Litigation and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: My 17yr daughter was caught shoplifting and we were never called isnt that required since she is a minor?

She was caught merchandise returned undamaged and noone contacted us. We werent made aware until legal letters came stating we were being held civilly liable for her actions. If I wasnt aware and she wasnt with us and we didnt even get a call about it how are we responsible? She asked if they were... Read more »

Kristen Dewar
Kristen Dewar answered on Jan 4, 2018

1) In NC, 17 year olds accused of crimes are currently still charged and treated as adults, so there is no requirement for anyone to contact you if your 17 year old daughter is charged with a crime. This does not fall into Juvenile Law, as in NC, your daughter for the purposes of criminal law, is... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Child Custody and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: What are all my options in getting my 16 year to return home in NC.

I have custody his father has every other weekend visitation. My child left with his father and now he refuses to bring him back. I know where my son is but he is not in his fathers care and I have been told if I go to the house where he is I will be arrested for trespassing. Since his father took... Read more »

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Dec 20, 2017

Are you kidding me? Go to local law enforcement with proof you have custody and have them escort you to go get you child. Now! Like right now - as soon as you are done reading this

1 Answer | Asked in Child Custody, Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: Im 14 years old and i want to go live with my gf family ? will i go to jail if i leave and go stay with them?

but leave them a note explaining to them the reason why im leaving and if i plan to return

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Dec 19, 2017

A note - that's cute. I especially like the 'if I plan to return' part - as if you have some sort of say in the matter, You likely won't go to jail but you can be forced to go back home where you belong. You are a child. Respect your parents, do what you are told and don't give them a hard time.

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Juvenile Law and Child Custody for North Carolina on
Q: Can parents legally kick out an 18yo still in high school in North Carolina?

My friend is 18 years old and lives in the state of North Carolina. He is currently a senior in high school. His parents are potentially going to kick him out. I understand that once an individual turns 18 they are a legal adult, but can his parents legally kick him out before he graduates? I've... Read more »

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Dec 4, 2017

At 18 there is no 'technically' about it - he's a legal adult, not a minor and being adopted is irrelevant. If the person is 18, the parents can tell him to leave whether he is still in school or not. They should not use self help (force to physically throw the 18 year old out). If he won't... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Child Custody and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: My ex is telling me that our 16 year old can move out of my house as long as he stays with a blood relative.

I have custody of him and his father does not work or have a stable residence can I make my 16 year old come home?

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Nov 30, 2017

Of course you can. Depending on your physical ability, you may need help if it comes down to forcing him to comply but you definitely have the authority to make him do pretty much anything you want until he turns 18.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Personal Injury, Civil Rights and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: I was charged as a minor but convicted as an adult. Is there anyway, besides expungement, to get those charges removed?

When I was 16 I got into a lot of trouble. The court system waited until I was an adult to fully convict me of a misdemeanor marijuana possession (1/2 > 1 & 1/2 oz) and now it's causing damage to my adult life. Is there any way to put these charges onto my juvenile record so that they will no... Read more »

Kristen Dewar
Kristen Dewar answered on Nov 22, 2017

There is no other way in NC to remove charges from your criminal record other than expungement. $4000 is a lot for an expungement of this type. I would keep calling around for quotes.

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: My seventeen-year-old daughter decided she wanted to move out of my home, she moved in with her friend and her mother,

We live in the state of North Carolina can I buy law force her to come back home. She told me after the age of 16 the police will not go get her and bring her back home.

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Nov 17, 2017

Until she turns 18 - yes, you can force her to return home.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: 20 year old gets a 16 year old pregnant, is it legal?
Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Nov 5, 2017

It's more along the lines of, it's not illegal.

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Juvenile Law and Real Estate Law for North Carolina on
Q: I am a 17 year old from North Carolina, my parents are thinking of buying a home under my name, is that possible?
Cameron Lambe
Cameron Lambe answered on Sep 16, 2017

It's hard to give an answer based on your question. While contracts made with a minor are generally valid (although the minor can often void them unless ratifying them after turning 18), the contract would need to be made with your consent. If you are implying that your parents are planning to... Read more »

2 Answers | Asked in Legal Malpractice, Car Accidents, DUI / DWI and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: My 20 year old son was knowingly allowed to enter a bar being marked as over 21 the legal drinking age. After he left

The bar he was involved in head on collision and was arrested for DWI I'm curious can any charges be made against the bar since his friend let him in. His friend is an employee of the establishment so he is their responsibility

William Head
William Head answered on Aug 6, 2017

Others injured or killed have the best claims. Your son willingly participated.

To get additional information, look at Super Lawyers, for NC personal injury attorneys in your town or the closest big city. Ask for guidance.

View More Answers

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Child Custody and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: social services came an removed my kids from there grandparents house 3days before our court date....

he came did a visit said everything was fine left and went to see kids at there grandparents and removed them without mentioning it too. I still haven't herd from him

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Jun 7, 2017

Yes, DSS does pretty much what ever they want. Do you have a question?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: Can my sixteen year old move out of my house in North Carolina

I have primary custody of him

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on May 29, 2017

Depends on what you mean by 'can'. They likely can do it just not legally unless they have been emancipated.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Family Law, Child Custody and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: If I am 16 and a 9 year old kid cusses out my mom, is it illegal for me to hit the kid?

We are not related. She is in foster care. She lives in the same house as me.

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on May 5, 2017

Yes.

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: My mom kicked me out, I am 15 with a 3Month old. What are legal problems I am facing if I go stay with my bf's family

We got into a physical fight so I left home for 2 days and when I came back she told me I needed to find somewhere else to live. My boyfriends family has said they can take me and my 3 month old in until I am 16 when I get emancipated. What happens if my mom reports them for kidnapping or something... Read more »

Will Blackton
Will Blackton answered on Feb 28, 2017

I am sorry to hear about your situation and wish you the best on it all working out.

Contact one or all of these three non-profit institutions and tell them about your situation, they should be able to help you:

http://www.wcwc.org/

http://www.interactofwake.org/...
Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Family Law, Domestic Violence and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: My younger brother of 15 yrs. continues to lay his hands on me (punch), steal, and verbally assault. What should I do?

My mom continues to punish him, but nothing gives. He disrespects everyone including her and me and verbally assault me by saying "shut up you fat f**ck." I can't continue to get my personal belongings missing because of him and constantly get hit. My mother doesn't hardly do anything because he... Read more »

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Feb 4, 2017

You can call law enforcement or go to your local magistrates office and swear out a warrant. This will likely cause problelms with your parents, so you should discuss it with them first. If they say no, your options may be to continue to put up with the criminal behavior or have him arrested and... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: I am 16 and I have court next week. My father keeps saying he isn't gonna take me and let me just go to jail.

Is this allowed? I am considered a juvenile and it is a juvenile court case. He is my only way of transportation. If he doesn't take me what will happen?

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Jan 13, 2017

Yes, it is allowed. A parent is not obligated to be your chauffeur. Take a cab, take a bus, call a friend or other family members - you gots lots of options. If you don't go to Court you will likely be arrested. If you are arrested, explain to everyone that you did your best to get to Court and... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Child Custody and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: Can an alleged father take an at home DNA test on a baby without the mother's consent?

The man did not sign the affidavit of parentage in the hospital nor is he on the birth certificate. The baby was left in the care of the man's mother for a few hours and DNA test was performed. Should I file a police report? I did not consent to the test and was not told about it.

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Nov 25, 2016

First, lets get facts straight - a DNA test was not performed - a sample was taken so that a DNA test could be performed. There is a difference. Most home DNA testing companies require permission of a legal guardian or parent but this requirement is very easy to get around so he could have had the... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Family Law, Federal Crimes and Juvenile Law for North Carolina on
Q: I am a 17 year old girl who is dating a 20 year old man. I turn 18 in 6 months.

My mom and her boyfriend do not approve of us. We hang out and still see each other so my mom has said she is going to file charges against him and take us to court. I would like to know if we're doing anything wrong? Or if there is anything I need to know about laws to keep us from trouble?

Amanda Bowden Houser
Amanda Bowden Houser answered on Sep 1, 2016

If you are disobeying your mother - then yes, you are doing something wrong. However, the more important question is is whether your boyfriend is doing anything legally wrong. Basically, the only thing your mother can legally do is keep you at home and prevent him from trespassing - maybe get a... Read more »

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