Questions Answered by Hector E. Quiroga

Q: US Embassy Ask me for DNA Again. In 2004 was establishment DNA and the court ordered child support. How I can prove it?

1 Answer | Asked in Child Support, Family Law and Immigration Law on
Answered on Jan 16, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
If that’s the only thing the Embassy is requesting, then it is probably the easiest thing to do. Without knowing all the details in your case, it is difficult to advise beyond that.

Q: Okay, I recently got married to my fiancé and she is not legal. Can I request a TIN for her?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Texas on
Answered on Jan 16, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
She can request an ITIN. It can take up to 8-10 weeks.

Q: Green Card / residency requirements

3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for California on
Answered on Jan 16, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
You will want to notify USCIS that you have updated your mailing address. That is only so USCIS can send you important information.

Q: If I am married to an illegal immigrant and have a child do I need his consent for adoption in the State of Florida ?

2 Answers | Asked in Adoption and Immigration Law for Florida on
Answered on Jan 15, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
Sounds like something you’ll need to check with the authorities in Florida who handle such things.

Q: I lost my relationship verification paper. Bit, I want to apply for green card and need the paper. Is there any way?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Massachusetts on
Answered on Jan 15, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
Not sure what a “relation verification paper” is, but the agency that issued it should be able to issue a replacement. Generally a marriage certificate reflects information that is on file with a government agency, such as a county courthouse in the US or a civil registry in Mexico. Either way a trip to the appropriate office should allow you to get a document verifying the necessary information.

Q: When is the last day for him to leave USA?

4 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Illinois on
Answered on Jan 15, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
15 days. https://studyinthestates.dhs.gov/sevis-help-hub/student-records/completions-and-terminations/terminate-a-studentdependent

Q: My fiance was detained on a P.I. charge and he has papers being processed but have not been approved yet?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Texas on
Answered on Jan 11, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
As quickly as you can, retain an immigration attorney.

Q: Parents brought me here illegally very young. I just want to know my options.

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law and Education Law for Nevada on
Answered on Jan 11, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
At this point, there is little you can do. You can file for DACA if the government decides to allow new applications. Right now it is only possible to renew.

Q: I have speeding tickets happened longtime ago. But my DMV driving record shows no violation. Where can i get them?

3 Answers | Asked in Traffic Tickets and Immigration Law for Louisiana on
Answered on Jan 11, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
You would answer yes. If you can’t get the records, then an explanation from the issuing agency that there is no record is your best option.

Q: Due to some reasons my friend Farhan Haider Shah can not come to USA to maintain the validity of his green card.Options?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law on
Answered on Jan 10, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
That is the date his green card expires? He can apply for an advance parole document that could allow him to stay out longer than that.

Q: how many years do i have to maintain a minimum income as a sponsor for green card application?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Washington on
Answered on Jan 10, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
As long as you meet the minimum requirement for the year he files his application, then yes. Currently the minimum income for a household of 2 is $20,575. That will go up on March 1st.

Q: Can I stay in the US if I have a pending I-485 based on F2A category and my F-1 student visa soon to be expired?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for New York on
Answered on Jan 10, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
If a visa was available to you, and you were in status when you applied, then yes.

Q: Can my sister petition our mother without paying for naturalization? She is already 23

3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for New York on
Answered on Jan 10, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
It is unclear what you mean by “she is already American citizen and a green card holder”. She is one or the other, not both. If she is a citizen, she can petition for your mother.

Q: I filled for naturalization (am married to us citizen for 3 years) How do I file for my kids.

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for Illinois on
Answered on Jan 3, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
They will also use the N-400 since they are over 18 and you are not yet a citizen.

Q: Hi, My mom entered US last Sept. 2018 and realize that she did not get a stamp from an immigration officer. What to do?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for California on
Answered on Jan 3, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
She should be able to go to the I-94 website and download a copy of her I-94, which will record all information that she needs to show a lawful entry.

Q: Can an ESTA App be denied in 2018 due to an Extension of Stay on an O1 Visa in 2015 not being computer updated by CBP?

2 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for California on
Answered on Jan 3, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
It’s hard to say why your ESTA was denied, but it seems unlikely that the reason you gave was the issue.

CPB officers have a great deal of discretion in deciding whether or not to approve or deny any benefit, including ESTA. Your only option might be to apply for a tourist visa instead.

Q: Do we have to notify USCIS if we rent an extra room apartment?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law for Oregon on
Answered on Jan 2, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
Unless you are moving to that apartment, or somehow a mailing address change is part of the process you have described, you should not need to notify USCIS.

Q: My father became a us citizen in 1997 when I was 11 years old why didn't I become one citizen?

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law on
Answered on Dec 31, 2018
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
You might have. Without knowing all of the details, however, it is hard to say. Your father should consult with an immigration attorney and provide specific information about the circumstances surrounding his acquisition of citizenship.

Q: About 30 years ago I became a naturalized US citizen in Dallas, TX. I also used this opportunity to changed my name.

1 Answer | Asked in Immigration Law on
Answered on Dec 31, 2018
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
You will have to apply for a new certificate of citizenship.

Q: I employed two illegal immigrant. One threatened to call ICE if I fired him. Any solution and what's the consequences?

3 Answers | Asked in Immigration Law for New Jersey on
Answered on Jan 2, 2019
Hector E. Quiroga's answer
That’s certain a different scenario. You are less likely to have problems having had undocumented immigrants working for you in then having them work for you in the event of an ICE raid or audit. In addition, this employee won’t be doing himself any favors by essentially reporting himself to ICE; that’s a sure one-way ticket to a removal hearing.

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