Alaska Criminal Law Questions & Answers

Q: How can I get a pro bono? I need one for a criminal case. Can you please point me in the right direction.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Federal Crimes, Civil Rights and Construction Law for Alaska on
Answered on Feb 9, 2019
Gary Kollin's answer
The public defender is the one who provides legal services to the people without funds

Q: Does ANYONE do PRO BONO?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Jan 12, 2019
Timur Akpinar's answer
Contact the Alaska Bar Association.

Tim Akpinar

Q: I was placed on felony probation after serving time for a felony dwi it will be 10 years ago this may I would like to ca

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and DUI / DWI for Alaska on
Answered on Oct 16, 2018
Daniel P Leavitt's answer
You will want to talk to an Alaska attorney who does criminal defense to see if they will consider dismissing your case in your circumstances.

Q: How do I find a lawyer that will do my case as a Pro Bono? I don't have much money if any and I really need some help.

2 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law, Domestic Violence and Wrongful Death for Alaska on
Answered on Sep 29, 2018
Gary Kollin's answer
Yes. There is an entire law firm. It is called the Public Defender's Office.

If you asking I seek a law firm for you, what can I tell the firm about the following?

What makes you special that you should deserve free services?

Have you paid it forward? That means what have you previously done without compensation without any belief that you would ever receive any benefit. Saying you would do it now is not paying it forward; it is better.

Q: So, the police in my city took my firearm as evidence back in december and the prosecutor sent them the release in Jan.

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights, Constitutional Law and Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Apr 16, 2018
Timothy Denison's answer
Send the detective a certified letter requesting release of the property or the reasons why the property is not being released. If there is no response, you should contact a lawyer and have him send a letter prior to filing suit.

Q: In court language anchorage ak what does just 3AN-P mean or represent.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Traffic Tickets, Landlord - Tenant and Public Benefits for Alaska on
Answered on Aug 11, 2017
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
It could be part of the case number.

3 = Third Judicial District

AN = Municipality of Anchorage

P = probate (?)

Q: Can a Felon with DUI CLASS C FELONY legal buy and Posess a firearm in Alaska?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and DUI / DWI for Alaska on
Answered on Jun 17, 2017
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
It's a federal crime for a convicted felon to possess a firearm. So unless the state site references the federal law it's incomplete.

Q: Hi my sister who is legally age took mostly all of my belongings without permission and packed them up while i was away

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and Family Law for Alaska on
Answered on Mar 21, 2017
Stefan Otterson's answer
Although you are family members, neither of you has an obligation to the other that goes beyond what two strangers would have. This isn't a matter of family law. You could report your sister's acts to the police, or you could bring a civil lawsuit yourself. Unless the property value was very high, you would do this in Small Claims Court, which has procedures that are conducive to handling things yourself without a lawyer.

Q: The Police Investigator in my husband's case also operates a private detective business. Is this legal?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Feb 28, 2017
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
No, it doesn't appear that the fact that this individual runs a private business on the side affects the validity of his investigative results. Whether or not members of the community think of him as a police officer or as a private investigator doesn't appear to matter as well. Alaska, by the way, doesn't license private investigators last time I checked.

Q: Can a adult be charged with crimes that they commited as a minor.

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Sep 16, 2016
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
Apparently the alleged crimes occurred over a three year period. Yes, the alleged perpetrator can be charged, unless criminal charges are tolled by any applicable statute of limitations, or unless there is an applicable close-in-age exception.

Q: Rule 403 Exluding Relevant Evidence

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and Constitutional Law for Alaska on
Answered on Aug 21, 2016
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
First, I disagree that C's offered testimony should have been excluded as hearsay. What A & B may have said was not offered (I suspect) for the truth of what they said, but rather for what they said. If, for example, A (according to C) said "I am going to get my gun and kill you, C", the statement wouldn't be probative as to whether A would later kill C, but rather whether A said the threat.

It could, however, have been excluded as being irrelevant. Without the entire transcript of...

Q: Jury Duty: What can I do to get the Judge to understand that I would not be a good Juror?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Apr 30, 2016
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
You will need to show up on the date and time. If you are actually placed on a jury panel (or "venire"), you will be given the chance to explain your attitude to the court and counsel and will probably be excused from serving on the jury.

It may well be a civil case, by the way, in which case you wouldn't be asked to find anyone guilty of a crime.

Q: Can I be a substance abuse councilor in the state of Alaska with a past(25 years ago) felony record?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Nov 1, 2015
Robert Jason De Groot's answer
Perhaps. The way to find out is to review the exclusions for licensure.

Q: What is disorderly conduct conviction? Criminal offense or violation?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Oct 27, 2015
Robert Jason De Groot's answer
Do you have an answer by now? Look it up in the statutes.

Q: Hotel management stole weed grinders and pipes from our bags while we were gone. was this legal?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Oct 9, 2015
Robert Jason De Groot's answer
That is typically called theft, and it is a crime. It was not legal.

Q: If a 21 and14 year old is in a relationship and both consent to having sex is that okay?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Oct 2, 2015
Robert Jason De Groot's answer
No. Do an internet search for age of consent in Alaska, and start reading the results to learn more.

Q: I am a victim of a robbery, a safe was taken from my residence as evidence how long must i wait to recieve my belongings

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law for Alaska on
Answered on Aug 14, 2015
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
Generally the authorities will need to keep evidence until the case(s) have been decided. Merely because one of the suspects asked to be "furloughed", doesn't mean that request will be granted, or that all prosecutions will be completely over. The case against each defendant will only be over when that person is acquitted, or convicted and all appeal options have been exhausted.

Justia Ask a Lawyer is a forum for consumers to get answers to basic legal questions. Any information sent through Justia Ask a Lawyer is not secure and is done so on a non-confidential basis only.

The use of this website to ask questions or receive answers does not create an attorney–client relationship between you and Justia, or between you and any attorney who receives your information or responds to your questions, nor is it intended to create such a relationship. Additionally, no responses on this forum constitute legal advice, which must be tailored to the specific circumstances of each case. You should not act upon information provided in Justia Ask a Lawyer without seeking professional counsel from an attorney admitted or authorized to practice in your jurisdiction. Justia assumes no responsibility to any person who relies on information contained on or received through this site and disclaims all liability in respect to such information.

Justia cannot guarantee that the information on this website (including any legal information provided by an attorney through this service) is accurate, complete, or up-to-date. While we intend to make every attempt to keep the information on this site current, the owners of and contributors to this site make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to from this site.