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Texas Energy, Oil and Gas Questions & Answers
2 Answers | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas, Patents (Intellectual Property) and Contracts for Texas on
Q: My Late husband died in an accident before retirement, he has 52 utility Patents and he was a Sr Software Engineer.

The company he worked for is now trying to say I new about the Patents so that they don't share my late husbands Royalities he would have gotten,with me. We were married 15 years until his death, if I had known he had all of those Patents I certainly would not have waited till now. I found out... Read more »

Kevin E. Flynn
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Kevin E. Flynn
answered on Apr 1, 2023

I am sorry about the accident that took your husband. While the patents are a part of this issue, I suspect that the prime legal arguments will be about the licenses or other agreements that your husband had with the company. This is contract law. The litigation will be primarily on contract law... Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas, Patents (Intellectual Property) and Contracts for Texas on
Q: My Late husband died in an accident before retirement, he has 52 utility Patents and he was a Sr Software Engineer.

The company he worked for is now trying to say I new about the Patents so that they don't share my late husbands Royalities he would have gotten,with me. We were married 15 years until his death, if I had known he had all of those Patents I certainly would not have waited till now. I found out... Read more »

James L. Arrasmith
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James L. Arrasmith pro label Lawyers, want to be a Justia Connect Pro too? Learn more ›
answered on Apr 9, 2023

As the widow of a late husband who had 52 utility patents as a senior software engineer, you may be entitled to a percentage of his royalties from the company he worked for. The fact that you did not know about all of his patents does not necessarily preclude you from receiving a share of the... Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Contracts and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: I signed solar panel purchase and installation agreement that has a couple issues and want to see if it's still binding

The first issue is that the agreement does not include my full first name, Stephen. The agreement has Steve as my first name. I assume this does not matter and the agreement is still valid, but could you please confirm? The 2nd issue is the "Design Services" Article states: American... Read more »

Jacob Rheaume
Jacob Rheaume pro label Lawyers, want to be a Justia Connect Pro too? Learn more ›
answered on Mar 14, 2023

First question:

The Steve v. Stephen distinction is not likely to matter, especially if you signed the Agreement already. Your signature will be indicia that you understood who they were referencing by calling you "Steve" (i.e., you wouldn't have signed if it called you...
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1 Answer | Asked in Business Law, Energy, Oil and Gas and Contracts for Texas on
Q: Can I sue based on Liberty's actions: I had a gas lease agreement to which liberty Utilities fails to provide any notice

Liberty Utilities fails to provide any notices within a 24 hour time of notice when they appear to vacate property without any such work. This company has continued to breach our agreement concerning no kind of notices within a 24 hour period before coming on the property. They refused to make... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Mar 8, 2023

I assume that since you reference a utility company that the agreement you have with them is an easement. It's unusual for a utility easement to require advance notice to the land owner to come on vacant land to do work, and especially if the utility believes the work may be needed for a... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: What if an oil company slant drilled on your property from another property 60 years ago in Oklahoma. Is it actionable
Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Feb 26, 2023

All states have statutes of limitations that prohibit bringing a claim after a certain number of years. You should contact an Oklahoma oil and gas attorney to determine what statute of limitations applies in your case. The answer will probably depend on a number of factors, such as: 1) when you... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: I am entering into a oil and gas lease with a company CNX and myself and 6 other heirs are being 15 percent royalties..

I am entering into a oil and gas lease with a company CNX and myself and 6 other heirs are being 15 percent royalties whay other things do i need to ask.. the well has apprently been operating with out notfiying heirs and is just now trying to remedy it?

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Feb 17, 2023

You should always have an oil and gas attorney review a lease before you sign it. The lease the landman offers you is almost always in favor of the oil company and unfair to the mineral owner.

Whether the company owes you past royalties or not depends on whether your mineral interest shows...
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1 Answer | Asked in Construction Law and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: Can I get out of the financing contract?

I signed up to have solar installed on my home. The installer came out and put panels up but they did not finish the installation. I cannot use my solar panels. The finance company says I still owe them money, however.

The installation company is ignoring me and the finance company.... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Feb 13, 2023

It's possible that you may be able to void the solar contract and the financing contract if the work was not completed. A lot depends on the wording of what you signed and on how Texas courts are currently interpreting these contracts. You will need to take all your paperwork to an attorney... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas, Municipal Law and Real Estate Law for Texas on
Q: How can I find out about noise ordinance in my city?

An oil company is pumping water out of a strip pit that is really close to my house and their pump runs continuously disturbing my sleep all hours of the night.

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Nov 8, 2022

Depending on where you live, your subdivision, city or county may have a noise ordinance and you can ask that they send someone out to measure the decibels produced by the pump and see if it violates the ordinance. If that does not work, you could ask the oil company if they are using a muffler on... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas and Municipal Law for Texas on
Q: How can I find out about noise ordinance in my city?

An oil company is pumping water out of a strip pit that is really close to my house and their pump runs continuously disturbing my sleep all hours of the night.

John Michael Frick
John Michael Frick
answered on Nov 8, 2022

Many Texas cities have websites. Often, a city’s code of ordinances is linked on its website. If not, the office of the city secretary maintains a city’s ordinances which are publicly accessible. You can go to that office and ask to see and copy the city’s noise ordinance.

2 Answers | Asked in Family Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate Law and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: Person in possession of heirship affidavit on my ancestor has been impersonating self as my deceased ancestor since 198-

She and her descendants filed false documents to access in a county court to collect royalty payments on the gas and oil leases which she forged. Need to file for the court to review all related documentation and restore my rights. Want to represent self in court as I can tell my story and... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Oct 5, 2022

It's hard to get an attorney to agree to a partial representation. That's like asking a surgeon to help you while you do your own gall bladder surgery. It's not a good idea to represent yourself in something like this. You will be held to the same standard as an attorney as far as... Read more »

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2 Answers | Asked in Family Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate Law and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: Person in possession of heirship affidavit on my ancestor has been impersonating self as my deceased ancestor since 198-

She and her descendants filed false documents to access in a county court to collect royalty payments on the gas and oil leases which she forged. Need to file for the court to review all related documentation and restore my rights. Want to represent self in court as I can tell my story and... Read more »

Richard Winblad
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Richard Winblad
answered on Oct 6, 2022

This is not a rant against you or against pro se litigants in general.

Your story may be compelling, but the problem is most clients need coaching in order to tell the relevant portions. Most clients want to bring up extraneous matters. You have limited time to explain the salient...
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1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas and Real Estate Law for Texas on
Q: The reservation is a 1/16 in deed but it’s but the land was under mineral lease when it was sold

The reservation is a 1/16 in deed but it’s because the land was under mineral lease when it was sold lessee held 15/16 interest in minerals. I can prove by one property owned at time and we still own had 1/16 conveyance from estates children to their mother because father died intestate and... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Sep 8, 2022

You can try sending copies of everything you have to the oil company by certified mail with a letter asking them to correct the situation. However, don't be surprised if what you send them is not enough to change their mind.

This is probably not a do-it-yourself project. First, it is...
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1 Answer | Asked in Civil Litigation, Real Estate Law and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: How hard is it to prove you are the rightful owner of mineral estate when someone else has been receiving lease bonuses

The reservation is a 1/16 in deed but it’s because the land was under mineral lease when it was sold lessee held 15/16 interest in minerals. I can prove by one property owned at time and we still own had 1/16 conveyance from estates children to their mother because father died intestate and... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Sep 7, 2022

Whether the process is simple or more challenging depends on the state of your mineral title. If you have a deed for these minerals it may be a matter of sending a copy of the deed to the oil company with a certified letter and requesting that they correct the error. Keep in mind that the landman... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts and Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: My mom has solar panels for abt 8 mon and she was told the panels were to produce what show in the light bill

What can we do, is there a way to cancel or terminate. They are paying double now in light bills. Solar panels aren't producing what she was told it was going to produce. Now the company wants her to add more panels and pay more when my mom was told something completely different. She also... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Sep 2, 2022

This is becoming a common problem with residential solar systems. Many states will allow a consumer to terminate a transaction if fraud was involved.However, no one can give you specific advice on your mother's rights unless they get a detailed fact statement from her and review the contract... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Agricultural Law, Energy, Oil and Gas and Land Use & Zoning for Texas on
Q: We own 83 acres of timber but not mineral rights. We have several homes (children) on our property and a cluster well.

We do not own mineral rights. Just received call from driller advising they will be drilling oil on our land. How do i protect our homes timber and water source?

Aimee Hess
PREMIUM
Aimee Hess
answered on Jul 13, 2022

In Texas, the mineral estate is the dominant estate. That means that the mineral owner and the oil company have the right to make all reasonable uses of the surface for exploration, drilling and production of oil and gas.

The Texas Railroad Commission, the state agency which regulates oil...
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1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: Below is not true.....Those were wells that were supposed to be paying me....The city came in after we signed ....and

.............took over,,,,,Trucks run 24 7......Somebody getting paid & it aint us....

There are wells on city land because the mineral owner for that property, i.e., the city, has signed an oil and gas lease that allows those wells. The royalties will go the the mineral owner, i.e.,... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Jun 10, 2022

If you are the mineral owner and the well is producing and the royalties are over the oil company's minimum for checks, you may be entitled to royalties. It's not possible to know what your rights and remedies are without a thorough analysis of your situation. Contact an oil and gas... Read more »

1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas and Real Estate Law for Texas on
Q: IF MINORS LAND IS SOLD ARE THE MINORS MINERAL RIGHTS NOT INCUDED IN THE SALE
Aimee Hess
PREMIUM
Aimee Hess
answered on Nov 27, 2022

It depends on the language of the deed. In Texas, in most cases if the minerals are not withheld via a reservation in the deed, then they go to the grantee/buyer.

1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: Had a lawyer working on a wrongful termination case for a large oil company I was employed with.

That lawyer was contacted by other lawyers and a class action suit was proposed. My case was then sent to a larger firm and my lawyer has since claimed inability to discuss the case. I don not know where the case was sent and haven't been contacted since March 2021. Is there any way to find... Read more »

Aimee Hess
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Aimee Hess
answered on Sep 23, 2022

You can call the clerk of the Court in which this case is pending.

1 Answer | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: I signed a Mineral Lease in Tarrant County Texas. How come I never got paid ?

Why are the Natural Gas Wells on city land ? Who is getting those cheeks ?...

Aimee Hess
PREMIUM
Aimee Hess
answered on Jun 10, 2022

There are wells on city land because the mineral owner for that property, i.e., the city, has signed an oil and gas lease that allows those wells. The royalties will go the the mineral owner, i.e., the city.

2 Answers | Asked in Energy, Oil and Gas for Texas on
Q: I have mineral rights and I found out a company has been drilling on those right for years and I have never been paid

I have contacted the company that is drilling and they say there is royalties that have accrued but they haven't paid them. This is not the company that the lease was signed with also I have contacted the company that is drilling and they say there is royalties that have accrued but they... Read more »

James Tack Jr
James Tack Jr
answered on Mar 18, 2022

Leases can be bought and sold many times before and after there is production so it is not uncommon for the operator of the well not to be the original lessee. Royalties are suspended because the operator can not mineral owner the owner or there is an issue with the title of the property that... Read more »

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