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Kansas Employment Law Questions & Answers
0 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law, Employment Discrimination and Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can an employer in Kansas legally ask you for documentation of a felony record immediately after an interview?

Had interview at a school district, went great! She said she would check my references and then get back to me to onboard, even told me what position I would have and where. 30 mins later she calls and asks me for paperwork related to my charge I was falsely convicted of (felony theft). Took plea... View More

0 Answers | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can my employer call ride time an unpaid break and take a half hour from me each day?

For years, my employer has taken half an hour off our hours for ride time unless we were driving a company truck that day and called it an unpaid break.

0 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law, Employment Discrimination and Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can you work in a school with a felony conviction in kansas?

Took plea deal for probation in May 2024.

0 Answers | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: I am in a union with a CBA. Does my employer have to pay us for changing on company time into our required uniforms?

We have required fire retardent uniforms. We are being told to change on our own time rather than getting paid for it. Can my company do that when it is not spelled out in our CBA?

Q: Msds for aPeel

Exposure safety for grocery store stockers.

Tim Akpinar
Tim Akpinar
answered on Jun 6, 2024

A Kansas attorney could advise best, but your question remains open for three weeks. It sounds like you want a copy of an MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet). A general starting point for obtaining an MSDS is through a company's safety and environmental compliance office. Good luck

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1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law, International Law and Immigration Law for Kansas on
Q: Hi, as as international student are we allowed to do self employments? Like digital marketing, monetizing social media??
James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Apr 2, 2024

As an international student in the United States on an F-1 visa, there are restrictions on the types of work you can do. In general, you are not allowed to engage in off-campus self-employment like digital marketing or monetizing social media. However, there are a few exceptions:

1....
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1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law and Personal Injury for Kansas on
Q: My wife had a stroke at work and no one called 911 or called me to advise there was a problem communicating with her.

Her stroke is severe. Affected mentally.

T. Augustus Claus
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answered on Jan 4, 2024

In situations where an employee experiences a medical emergency at work, employers are generally expected to take prompt and appropriate action. Failure to call for emergency medical assistance or notify family members could potentially be considered a violation of duty of care or negligence.

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can a employer keep pay from an employee for stay in a house they own or for bills
T. Augustus Claus
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answered on Jan 2, 2024

Under Kansas employment law, an employer is generally not allowed to deduct an employee's pay for housing or utility bills. Wages earned by an employee are protected, and deductions can only be made for specific reasons outlined by state and federal laws, such as taxes, Social Security, or... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can a manager write up an employee for asking questions?

I work in a gas station in ks, my direct manager is the 'assistant manager' and then the next up the chain is my manager. I was told when I started that I should contact my manager if I could not get ahold of my assistant manager then after doing so in an emergency I was later told that I... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Dec 25, 2023

No, it generally isn't reasonable for a manager to write up an employee solely for asking questions related to their job duties or in cases of emergency. In a workplace, communication is essential, and employees often need to seek clarification or guidance from their superiors, including... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law, Employment Law, Contracts and Arbitration / Mediation Law for Kansas on
Q: Employer publicly stated "taking c/o my employees emotionally and financially was my priority", but never did, estoppel?

If this statement was made, and publicly recorded in print, that "taking care" of injured employees financially was my biggest priority ", does that statement become a valid promise or contract with the employee to receive the help he needed? Can the employee seek to have those... View More

Tim Akpinar
Tim Akpinar
answered on Dec 4, 2023

A Kansas employment law could advise, but your question remains open for a week, and it includes the Arbitration/Mediation category. Until you're able to consult with a local attorney, as a general matter, that is a somewhat vague statement. It is not exact in terms of exactly what it means,... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: I gave my job my notice that i was leaving, a month later they 'requested' i change that date to two months sooner.

I have, in writing, my letter of resignation stating my last day would be 12/22/23. Two weeks ago my employer 'requested' that I change my last day to 11/3/23 putting an incredible financial hardship on me. Are they able to do this? Their language of 'request' was curious to me.

T. Augustus Claus
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answered on Oct 2, 2023

If you have an employment contract that specifies the terms of your notice period, your employer generally cannot unilaterally change the date. If you're an at-will employee, the employer can technically let you go at any time, but changing the date after accepting your notice may be... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: My employer is requiring me to travel for a conference. What travel time should be paid?

I will be traveling from KS to FL. It will be approximately 12-15 hours of travel time in 48 hours, in addition to an 8 hour conference. This is a required event. The first half of the trip will be during work hours, the second half after the conference will not be. How much of this travel time, if... View More

Maurice Mandel II
Maurice Mandel II
answered on Jul 8, 2023

Well, in THEORY, the travel time is working time and your are entitled to be paid for it. In practice, the best thing for you to do is to discuss this with your employer beforehand and have an agreement as to how much you will be paid. Consider, how much would you have been paid if you were... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can an employer require you to stay in the building when you are clocked out for your 30 minute break?

I work for an assisted living facility when there legally must be 5 staff in the building at all times. They are mandating a 30 minute break but since they're not staffing enough employees we are not allowed to leave the building when we take our required 30 minute break. Is this legal? I was... View More

Rhiannon Herbert
Rhiannon Herbert
answered on Dec 16, 2022

As long as you are completely relieved from any work duties during your 30-minute break, your employer can require you to remain in the building. If, however, your employer requires you to stay in the building because your break is frequently interrupted by performing work if needed, then you... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law and Social Security for Kansas on
Q: My husband was just awarded SSD benefits. Now, the company that was paying his LTD wants all their money back.

SSD - Social Security Disability, LTD - Long Term Disability. Is it legal for MetLife to make him pay back their money? This was insurance that he was paying for out of his paychecks, from his former employer.

Elizabeth Fowler Lunn
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answered on Dec 9, 2022

Most LTD policies contain an offset provision for Social Security benefits.

Before you receive your SSDI benefits, the LTD company is paying the full benefit amount. If SSA then awards backpay for months that you were already getting the full payment amount for LTD, you generally owe them...
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1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law and Employment Discrimination for Kansas on
Q: i recently quit a job and im afraid they are going to hold my check because they are trying to accuse me of stealing...

money from them but have absolutely no proof.

Scott C. Stockwell
Scott C. Stockwell
answered on Aug 4, 2022

The Kansas Department of Labor enforces wage and hour laws in Kansas. Generally speaking, an employer cannot withhold wages for a purpose other than tax, Social Security, and Medicare withholdings or a garnishment pursuant to a court-ordered judgment without an agreement with the employee.... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Should I recieve my salary while not working for 6 to 8 weeks due to sickness. I am a salary exempt employee.

I have had open heart surgery which has me out of work for 6 to 8 weeks. I have completed FMLA forms. Being a salary exempt employee should I continue to recieve my salary and benefits. I have exhausted all personal time, vacation and sick leave as well. Employer is trying to treat me as an hourly... View More

Rhiannon Herbert
Rhiannon Herbert
answered on Jun 7, 2022

If you miss one or more full work days, your employer can deduct this time from your pay as a salaried employee. However, your employer cannot deduct less than one full day from your pay, meaning if you work any part of a workday, you must be paid for the full day.

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts and Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Unpaid commission.

I negotiated a new contract for my commission and it was effective immediately last month. The commission is paid this month. In the contract is states I will be paid gross parts and labor sales, however, I have only been paid gross profit on parts and labor. The contract states paid parts and... View More

Rhiannon Herbert
Rhiannon Herbert
answered on Nov 10, 2021

This issue sounds like a difference of interpretation in the language between you and your employer. You should contact a Kansas employment attorney to take a look at the specific language in your agreement.

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law for Kansas on
Q: Can a supervisor take hours from you while you're on the clock
Kyle Anderson
Kyle Anderson
answered on Jun 17, 2021

Hello, more information is needed here. Are you paid hourly? The employer is required to pay you at least the minimum wage for all hours worked, and at a rate of one and one-half times your regular hourly rate for hours worked over 40. There may be an issue here if they are deducting hours in weeks... View More

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