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California Sexual Harassment Questions & Answers
1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Federal Crimes, Identity Theft and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: Need attorney for full body biometric data theft using California Privacy Law Loophole as excuse. Have been injured.

Targeted for total body biometric data theft, hurt and injured. State of California Privacy Law Loophole permitted harm.

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 13, 2024

Under California law, you have rights and protections against unauthorized collection and use of your biometric data. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) provide strong privacy protections, including the right to know what personal information is... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: I was groped by the owner of a store in Fullerton, Ca. I filed a police report .

I went to buy a phone charger at the store, he didnt have the right port for it and he said , I can use his charger. While i was waiting I needed to use the bathroom he took me to the back, and open the door while i was using it . I was in shock. After that I proceeded to wash my hands and he grab... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on May 11, 2024

I'm so sorry that you experienced this sexual assault. What happened to you was not your fault, and you did the right thing by reporting it to the police. Sexual assault is a serious crime, and the store owner's actions were completely unacceptable.

Here are some steps you can...
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1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law, Domestic Violence, Federal Crimes and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: I was charged with a domestic violence and probation violation. when I got booked in to jail the inmates wanted2KillMe

The inmate's wanted to kill me their we're going to slice my throat. Plus the sheriff's and the officer's they didn't even let me go to Court and testify. My case has fallen in their Plans. To convict me of a harsh and harder law suit. I had to appear at court to testify... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Apr 18, 2024

I'm so sorry to hear about the awful situation you're facing. Being threatened with violence in jail and feeling that law enforcement and your public defender are not properly handling your case must be incredibly frightening and stressful.

It sounds like you need to get in touch...
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1 Answer | Asked in Employment Discrimination, Employment Law and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: I don’t know who can assist me with my ongoing issues … that begun after I file an labor claim

- [ ] constant harassment, placing of the voice recorders on all areas of the property (including the vehicles), entering into my living quoters and taking without my knowledge my SS card and other very important documentation, accessing my living quarters without my knowledge or permission in... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Mar 18, 2024

In California, the issues you are describing raise serious legal concerns including harassment, theft, fraud, and defamation, among others. You have the right to seek legal recourse, and there are multiple avenues available for you to address these violations. Reporting these incidents to the... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Discrimination, Employment Law and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: What if employer doesn’t pay settlement agreement

If they don’t pay would it be easy to collect payment?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Mar 8, 2024

If your employer fails to pay the settlement agreement as specified, under California law, you have legal recourse to enforce the agreement. The first step would be to notify your attorney about the non-payment. Your attorney can then take action by possibly filing a motion to enforce the... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Discrimination, Employment Law and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: What rights do intermittent employees have when filing a discrimination complaint in the workplace to HR?

I was a CSU union employee for 7yrs and I wasn't informed until January 3, 2024 that my contract was terminated on June 30, 2023. I worked in the production department as a stage technician for the campus performing arts center. I was employed under a temp status and my contract was renewed... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Feb 28, 2024

Under California law, all employees, regardless of their employment status—whether permanent, temporary, or intermittent—have the right to file a complaint about discrimination in the workplace. This right extends to filing a retaliation claim if you believe you were terminated as a consequence... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Sexual Harassment and Criminal Law for California on
Q: Is it considered “Sexual Battery (243.4 PC)” for an individual to “Touch a Woman’s Stomach” solely?

If an individual were for any reason including in a fraudulent matter to claim that “Touching the Stomach region” solely was to provide some type of benefit, and acted on that false claim by Touching that other person’s Stomach solely would they be charged with “Sexual Battery (243.4 PC)”?

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Feb 24, 2024

Under California law, sexual battery as defined by Penal Code 243.4 PC involves touching the intimate part of another person without their consent and with the specific intent of sexual arousal, sexual gratification, or sexual abuse. The definition of an "intimate part" includes the... View More

1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights, Domestic Violence, Libel & Slander and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: Hi my ex boyfriend has been stalking me for about six months and I need help on how to get a restraining order

He keeps calling and texting but I have no record of it because I would ignore the calls and delete them. I am scared of him because when I tried to kick him out of my apartment he had tried to hit me six months ago and when I file for a restraining order they said they can't do anything since... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jan 28, 2024

Under California law, you have the right to seek a restraining order against someone who is stalking or harassing you, including an ex-boyfriend. Since you have experienced physical threats and property damage, this significantly supports your case for a restraining order.

Begin by...
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Q: Is it normal for a multi million $ company to ask to pay me in 2 payments 12 months apart & ask we drop lawsuit asap?

I was wrongfully terminated from my employment and offered a lot of money which I turned down. I hired an attorney and we filed a lawsuit. The company requested we go to mediation so we did. After a lot of going back-and-forth all day with a mediator, we finally decided on a number however, they... View More

David H. Relkin
David H. Relkin
answered on Jan 26, 2024

If you have stated the facts correctly, I would have a problem with the payout. According to your statement of the case, you have to "drop" the lawsuit after the first payment but "they are not ok with you going through the courts to enforce the payment" --[presumably] the... View More

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Q: Is it normal for a multi million $ company to ask to pay me in 2 payments 12 months apart & ask we drop lawsuit asap?

I was wrongfully terminated from my employment and offered a lot of money which I turned down. I hired an attorney and we filed a lawsuit. The company requested we go to mediation so we did. After a lot of going back-and-forth all day with a mediator, we finally decided on a number however, they... View More

Neil Pedersen
Neil Pedersen
answered on Jan 26, 2024

Whether something in your settlement is normal is a difficult question because very few things could be comfortably characterized as normal. There are dozens of ways that most settlement agreements can be structured. Does it happen that parties agree to allowed payments over time? Yes, of... View More

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Q: Is it normal for a multi million $ company to ask to pay me in 2 payments 12 months apart & ask we drop lawsuit asap?

I was wrongfully terminated from my employment and offered a lot of money which I turned down. I hired an attorney and we filed a lawsuit. The company requested we go to mediation so we did. After a lot of going back-and-forth all day with a mediator, we finally decided on a number however, they... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jan 26, 2024

In California, it's not unusual for settlements in employment litigation to involve structured payments, such as the company proposing to pay you in two installments 12 months apart. This arrangement can be for various reasons, including financial planning or tax considerations for the... View More

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Q: My former employer failed to protect me from domestic violence and sexual harassment in the workplace.

I have suffered mentally and physically and can no longer work in the field I am trained in.

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Jan 19, 2024

Under California law, employers have a duty to provide a safe working environment, which includes taking reasonable steps to prevent and address domestic violence and sexual harassment in the workplace. If an employer fails to fulfill this duty, they may be liable for any harm that results.... View More

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Q: My former employer failed to protect me from domestic violence and sexual harassment in the workplace.

I have suffered mentally and physically and can no longer work in the field I am trained in.

Maya L. Serkova
Maya L. Serkova
answered on Jan 18, 2024

I am sorry this happened to you. More specific facts are needed to understand if you have any meritorious claims against your former employer. These types of cases are very facts and detail-oriented. I suggest you consult an employment law attorney who will further examine your situation and... View More

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1 Answer | Asked in Civil Rights and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: I was exited from a homeless shelter because I was speaking to staff aggressively after they unlocked and opened the

The bathroom door while I was taking a shower, they had no right to do such a thing especially do to the fact that when the knocked I responded and just cause they didn't like the way I was responding thats why they opened the door on me and now here I am with my pregnant gf living in my... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Dec 31, 2023

I'm sorry to hear about the distressing situation you're facing. Under California law, you have several options to seek justice and address these grievances.

Firstly, it's important to document everything. Keep a record of the dates, times, and details of these incidents,...
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2 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law, Family Law, Personal Injury and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: If there is a abusive parent can I move out in California at 16

Im 16 cant get a job because parents wont allow me too

There was a investigacion made by the police and it conculuded withe the abusive parent coming back to the house and now I am forced to interact with him as if nothing ever happened

Brad S Kane
Brad S Kane
answered on Dec 25, 2023

According to the California Courts,

Emancipation is a legal way for a 14 to 17-year-old to become free from their parent's custody and control. In many ways, they are legally like an adult.

There are three ways to get emancipated:

Get legally married. In California,...
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2 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law, Family Law, Personal Injury and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: If there is a abusive parent can I move out in California at 16

Im 16 cant get a job because parents wont allow me too

There was a investigacion made by the police and it conculuded withe the abusive parent coming back to the house and now I am forced to interact with him as if nothing ever happened

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Dec 25, 2023

In California, the law generally requires you to be 18 years old to move out without parental consent. However, there are exceptions, especially in situations involving abuse. If you are facing abuse, you have the right to seek help. You can contact child protective services or another trusted... View More

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3 Answers | Asked in Criminal Law and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: Could this person still be prosecuted?

If someone were to admit to a woman that he had ejaculated into a cup of coffee that she drank months ago and she had no proof this is occurred. However the event did occur. And hypothetically speaking what would happen if the person was lying when he told her that? This is a serious question not... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Dec 5, 2023

Under California law, the scenario you described could potentially involve criminal charges related to battery or poisoning, depending on the specific circumstances and evidence. Battery, in a legal context, typically refers to intentional and unlawful physical contact with another person. If the... View More

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1 Answer | Asked in Copyright, Criminal Law, Personal Injury and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: I live in Los Angeles and an ex romantic partner posted an intimate video of me without consent (Poland). What do I do?

He's also stalking me, taunting me by showing all of the personal information he has about me, which I did not give. He calls me various slurs, tells me that I would be better off dead, etc. Would California extradite someone from Poland for this or do I have to pursue justice in Poland?... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Nov 20, 2023

Your situation is complex and distressing, involving issues of non-consensual sharing of intimate images, stalking, and harassment. In California, the distribution of such images without consent is illegal, and you have legal rights that can be enforced.

Regarding the video posted without...
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2 Answers | Asked in Personal Injury and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: i had a situation occur while. I was changing in a fittng room of a well known high end dept store. A lady was peeking i

in on me while i was changing. the people that worked there failed to do anything about it. denied they new anything bout who it was anmd didnt make them leave. come to find out it was store security. i felt totally lied too and violated by the situation. i cant believe it could be ok for them to... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Nov 8, 2023

What you described sounds like a very unfortunate and disturbing situation. Some thoughts:

- Being viewed naked without consent is a serious invasion of privacy. The store should not have allowed or condoned this type of surveillance.

- You felt violated, which is completely...
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1 Answer | Asked in Landlord - Tenant and Sexual Harassment for California on
Q: My landlord said he would deduct money from what I owed him in exchange for oral sex. Do I have a case against him?

Now he says, "he no longer wants to rent the property and I have 60 days to get out. However, the other male roommate that lives here has not been evicted. I live in a house with two men and one is the sub leaser/landlord. What can I do to give me more time to find a place to live? How can I... View More

James L. Arrasmith
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answered on Nov 6, 2023

Under California law, proposing to exchange rent for sexual favors can constitute sexual harassment and is illegal under the Fair Employment and Housing Act. You may file a complaint with the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH). Regarding the eviction notice, if you have a... View More

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