Animal / Dog Law Questions & Answers

Q: My fiance killed himself, his adult children took dogs w/o knowledge, he was in TN with sister to get treatment his ....

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Kentucky on
Answered on Jan 30, 2019
Timothy Denison's answer
Yes. You have recourse. Get all your payments together and present them to the children. If they don’t reimburse you or give you the dogs, you may have to file suit for your money.

Q: Can the police illegally enter my home and take my husband's 2 service animals and sell them through the Humane Society?

2 Answers | Asked in Personal Injury, Animal / Dog Law, Civil Rights and Federal Crimes for Colorado on
Answered on Jan 29, 2019
Juliet Piccone's answer
This is not the type of question that can be answered without more information. I would highly recommend that you contact an attorney who handles these matters on a regular basis. In general, when a disabled person is incarcerated the police can impound service dogs unless the disabled person's condition absolutely cannot be ameliorated by other means, for example a person or medication that the jail would have to supply. Every jurisdiction is different as far as what notice needs to be...

Q: I was told my dog died in the boarding family, and they refused to make compensation. Can I ask them pay for the loss?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law, Civil Litigation and Employment Discrimination for California on
Answered on Jan 29, 2019
Ali Shahrestani, Esq.'s answer
If you bought the dog, then until you sold the dog to new owners, it can be argued that it was your responsibility to properly vaccinate the dog with the parvo virus and other relevant vaccines. It sounds like the owner and the in-laws were merely boarding the dog for you while you found a new owner. I hear no acceptance of liability by them in your stated facts, nor any contractual relationship that points to any liability by them. Did the sellers tell you that they had vaccinated the dog...

Q: My dad and uncle are taking care of my dog since I cant have it where I live. My uncle is threatening me to give heraway

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 28, 2019
William John Light's answer
Sound like you need to find another home for your dog. You can't force your uncle to take care of him. He doesn't want the dog at his home anymore and has informed you of that. If you don't pick up the dog, he might be able to argue that you abandoned it. He would then be free to find another home for it.

Q: Three dogs were found inside the goat fence. Two goats dead and one was half eaten. Owners say I didn't actually see

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Mississippi on
Answered on Jan 27, 2019
Arthur Calderon's answer
This sounds like a classic example of a circumstantial evidence case.

Q: I recently went to a dog pound ro adopt a dog and they ask if we had a fenced in yard and and we said no wotch was fine

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 26, 2019
William John Light's answer
The "dog pound" is within its rights to restrict adoption of its dogs to persons with a fenced yard.

Q: Neighbor called animal control on my dog to take her away from us because she got out. She knows it's our dog and didnt

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 26, 2019
William John Light's answer
She is entitled to call Animal Control if your dog is loose, even if she knows to whom the dog belongs.

Q: My neighbors have 6 dogs. They are little dogs but...

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Florida on
Answered on Jan 26, 2019
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
If you don't want to spend the money, for either a fence or an attorney, and if animal control won't help, the only remaining option is to not let your children out of the house unaccompanied.

If I were you I would advise the neighbors that, if they continue to let the dogs into the front yard, I wouldn't be so careful to hit the brakes in the future.

Q: Was watching a dog for friend for a month until she got on her feet. Had to move before she could take him. Gave him up

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Kentucky on
Answered on Jan 26, 2019
Timothy Denison's answer
Obviously, if you could get the dog back, problem solved. If you cannot get the dog back, there’s really nothing she can do to you. She had the opportunity to get him back when you told her and couldn’t so her window has closed.

Q: my large dog pinned a small old dog I paid vet bill incase old dog was internally hurt (xray) can I still be sued?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 25, 2019
William John Light's answer
You can be sued if your negligence caused harm to another person, or to their property. Here, the issue is damage to property (I assume that the dog owner was uninjured). If the other dog was uninjured and you have already paid for the initial vet visit to confirm that, I do not understand why you would be sued. If you are sued, tender the lawsuit to your insurer. Many homeowner policies provide coverage for this type of claim.

Q: Took neighbor's hypothermic puppy but left a note. Can they charge me with theft? Dog was returned.

2 Answers | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Colorado on
Answered on Jan 24, 2019
Kristina M. Bergsten's answer
Technically, yes, you could be charged with theft. It would be up to the responding police officer whether to charge you or not. It would most likely be a misdemeanor unless they claim the dog is worth more than a few hundred dollars. I think your statement that you should call animal control next time is correct. Also, be careful about what you post online because IF you ARE charged, it could be used against you in court.

Q: My friends mom put her dog down without her consent. Is this legal?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 24, 2019
William John Light's answer
If your friend was a minor, then the dog probably belonged to her parents.

Next, it is possible that euthanizing a healthy animal may constitute the crime of animal cruelty. However, it is likely that we don't have all the facts that led to the decision to euthanize the animal. It seems improbable that a veterinarian would euthanize a dog for "no true reason".

Q: Abandoned dog, owner did not want him, but now wants him back..

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 24, 2019
William John Light's answer
If you contend that the prior owner abandoned him or gave him to you, you are now the new owner and are under no obligation to return the dog. If she contends that there was an "open adoption" in which she was entitled to return of the dog upon her notice, then you have to give the dog back. There is no resolution of these positions. She can report the dog stolen. She can file suit in Small Claims against you and request an Order for return of the dog. If she wins, then you have to return...

Q: I gave my 2 micro chipped husky's away to someone for free, now they are selling them for $500. is the illegal?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Florida on
Answered on Jan 23, 2019
Terrence H Thorgaard's answer
Dogs are property. When you give property away, the recipient is free to sell that property. So yes.

Q: Can I press charges against the owner of some loose dogs that came on to my property and killed my rabbit in the hutch?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for Indiana on
Answered on Jan 22, 2019
Alexander Florian Steciuch's answer
Yes, you can. Owners are responsible for the actions of their animals. You should consult with an attorney in your area who handles animal law or tort claims.

Q: I gave someone my dog to keep while his wife had cancer. He promised to give my dog back after she died. Now he won’t

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law, Criminal Law, Family Law and Federal Crimes for Pennsylvania on
Answered on Jan 22, 2019
Kathryn Hilbush's answer
I doubt you can sue her for theft since your uncle handed the dog over to her. Maybe if you offer to reimburse her for the vet bills she'll return the dog. Since she seems to care enough for the dog to spend a decent amount of money on her, perhaps the nicest thing you can do for your dog is allow her to stay where she is and get yourself another one to love.

Q: Our association has a twenty-five pound limit on dogs. Can a young healthy girl bring in an 80 pound service dog? WPB

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law, Land Use & Zoning and Personal Injury for Florida on
Answered on Jan 19, 2019
Charles M. Baron's answer
If it's truly a certified service dog that serves the girl, yes, she has the right to have such a dog at ANY weight. HOWEVER, service dogs are NEVER vicious! They are trained to be very tolerant of people and dogs. Therefore, sounds like there is fraud going on, and there should be a legally proper inquiry to verify the dog's status. There is plenty of material on-line on what constitutes a legally proper inquiry, but if you have trouble finding that out, set an appointment with an attorney...

Q: is it legal to leave your dog in the backyard alone for months while you're away if someone comes by and feeds him?

1 Answer | Asked in Animal / Dog Law for California on
Answered on Jan 17, 2019
William John Light's answer
You cannot take somebody else's animal because you don't approve of the manner in which they care for it. If you suspect Animal Cruelty, notify your local Animal Control office.

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