Antitrust Questions & Answers by State

Antitrust Questions & Answers

Q: What's the best way for consumers to report potential price-fixing schemes?

1 Answer | Asked in Antitrust for California on
Answered on Sep 25, 2018
T. J. Jesky's answer
Price fixing takes place when competitors enter into an agreement to set prices of goods, at the expense of their customers and the free trading market. If you identify a price fixing scheme, you have the ability to take action against the price fixers. If you believe the price fixers are breaking state law, you can contact your State Attorney General. If the price fixers are breaking federal antitrust laws, you can contact the Federal Trade Commission or the Department of Justice.

Q: what are my rights as a patient when I'm awake and buy a maintenance man on a ladder standing on a ladder in my room

2 Answers | Asked in Consumer Law, Personal Injury, Antitrust and Civil Rights for California on
Answered on Sep 23, 2018
Louis George Fazzi's answer
If I understand you correctly, you are an inpatient in a hospital room in which you awoke at 1:30 a.m. to find a maintenance man on a ladder in your room, apparently working on something. As a patient, whether you are in a private room or not, you do not have the same right to privacy as when you are in your own home or a hotel or motel. You are in the hospital's premises. You may want to talk to your nurse to let him/her know that the incident was unexpected and upset you. However, the nurse...

Q: Is it possible for someone to sue you for sleeping with their husband if you didn’t know

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce, Antitrust, Gov & Administrative Law and Libel & Slander for North Carolina on
Answered on Jul 31, 2018
Amanda Bowden Houser's answer
At 19 you likely possess nothing worth suing for and should likely be more afraid of the threat to 'fight you' than the threat of being sued.

Q: My father won't give me what my grandmother left me told me to go legal

1 Answer | Asked in Antitrust and Probate for California on
Answered on Jun 12, 2018
Richard Samuel Price's answer
Did your grandmother have a will? The executor of the will must lodge the will with the probate court and your grandmother's property must be distributed according to the terms of the will.

If your grandmother didn't have a will and your father is still living, you may not be within the intestate heirs of your grandmother.

Q: I need help.. my grandfather died... and there were problems with the will.. there are 2 heirs myself and step sister.

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Real Estate Law and Antitrust for Ohio on
Answered on Jun 4, 2018
Justin B. Benedict's answer
This is more of a probate matter. You may have more success posting your question in the probate section. Also, the Ohio State Bar Association and local bar associations (Columbus Bar Association, etc) have lists to recommend attorneys in most legal areas like probate law. They can put you in touch with an attorney directly to possible help you with your situation.

Q: I was just curious if it is illegal to let someone look at your check and compare it to theirs

2 Answers | Asked in Employment Law, Antitrust, Banking and Business Law for New Jersey on
Answered on May 19, 2018
Salim U. Shaikh's answer
If checks are lying openly for individual collection and looking at by others cannot be termed as illegal unless there are certain limitations imposed by the employer to keep it confidential from others. Employer's liability would likewise be engaged if they failed to safeguard confidentiality which otherwise breached by others deliberately or by chance.

Q: Tenant lives in guest attic (has water, electricity, working toilet/shower) 2 doors to attic, whatif he tries to breakin

1 Answer | Asked in Land Use & Zoning, Landlord - Tenant, Criminal Law and Antitrust for Illinois on
Answered on May 16, 2018
James G. Ahlberg's answer
Yes, though you'll want to consider how it will affect your relationship with your fiance.

Q: The company I work for is asking us to buy and wear their clothes when at work, as new styles come in. 7-50% of wages.

1 Answer | Asked in Employment Law and Antitrust for New Mexico on
Answered on May 3, 2018
Salim U. Shaikh's answer
Company cannot compel you to buy their stuff, however, they may offer subsidized prices for employees to use their clothing when at work.

Q: Can a detective from ongoing case search your house during a warrant being executed?

1 Answer | Asked in Criminal Law and Antitrust for Illinois on
Answered on Apr 2, 2018
Juan Ooink's answer
If it is a Search Warrant that is the point of the warrant, so yes. If it is an Arrest Warrant, they can search the house looking for the person named in the warrant.

Q: I'm 22 and live in Florida. Right after my Dad passed, stepmother tried to sell his house and get 100% of his estates.

1 Answer | Asked in Estate Planning, Antitrust and Probate for Florida on
Answered on Mar 19, 2018
Andy Wayne Williamson's answer
Simple answer, you need to run not walk to a probate attorneys office in the area where your dad lived when he died. What you describe is very serious and I am greatly concerned as you do not state time frames when this took place.

There is no way for an attorney to help you via this online forum.

Good luck,

Q: I am a realtor and I have an anti-trust law question.

1 Answer | Asked in Antitrust and Real Estate Law for North Dakota on
Answered on Mar 8, 2018
Lucas Wynne's answer
To the contrary, it would likely be an anti-trust violation if you somehow prevented those buyers from participating freely in the real estate market or prohibiting them from contacting certain agents. There is a grave difference between an anti-trust violation and an unfair advantage. It does not sound like the other agent participated in any form of collusion, price fixing, etc. Instead, it sounds like you had potential buyers who did not sign any contract with you that then found a house...

Q: Wife disappeared, took our 3 kids out of state without notice or answering phone for weeks. Enrolled them in school but

1 Answer | Asked in Divorce, Family Law, Antitrust and Child Custody for Florida on
Answered on Feb 22, 2018
Rand Scott Lieber's answer
You can file for divorce where you live. Once she is served you can ask the court to order her to return the kids to where you live. The longer she is away and establishing the children in a new city, the more difficult it will be for you.

Q: Can a sign shop owner who has classes have T&C that keep participants from opening up a sign shop in a 200 mile radius?

1 Answer | Asked in Antitrust, Land Use & Zoning, Business Law and Consumer Law for Florida on
Answered on Feb 1, 2018
Andy Wayne Williamson's answer
Short answer, I don't think so, but it doesn't mean that the sign shop owner cannot try. Typically agreements like you describe are apart of an employment agreement and are referred to as a non compete agreement.

I suggest that a consult with an attorney in your area may be appropriate to make sure any documents ect are viewed by the attorney and then specific advice given.

Q: My husband moved out of state we are still married can he take our kids and move against my will?

1 Answer | Asked in Family Law, Antitrust, Child Custody and Civil Rights for Illinois on
Answered on Jan 29, 2018
James G. Ahlberg's answer
Unless a court order exists which determines custody between you and your husband, each of you has the same rights to the children. Neither one of you needs the permission of the other to move with the children unless a court order establishing the rights between you exists or depriving one of you of your parental rights.

Q: Signing an NDA a while after the meeting

1 Answer | Asked in Contracts, Copyright, Antitrust and Business Law on
Answered on Jan 4, 2018
Will Blackton's answer
This depends on state law and a number of other factors. Without knowing what state you're in nor the circumstances of your situation, an attorney is not going to be able to offer you legal advice.

For example, in North Carolina and in most states, if an agreement lacks consideration, it's unenforceable. So, if an employer asks an employee to sign a non-compete agreement out of the blue, after that employee has already been working for the employer for several years, and the employer...

Q: Circumventing exclusive distribution agreement - to sell into territory of an exclusive distributor

1 Answer | Asked in Business Law, Consumer Law, Contracts and Antitrust for New Jersey on
Answered on Dec 7, 2017
Leonard R. Boyer's answer
No it is not lawful and you could end up with criminal consequences.

Q: How do I report an antitrust violation?

1 Answer | Asked in Antitrust for California on
Answered on Nov 29, 2017
Daniel Low's answer
You can report the violation to the U.S. Department of Justice, Antitrust Division at https://www.justice.gov/atr/report-violations. Or the California Attorney General's Office at https://oag.ca.gov/consumers. If possible, I would recommend discussing the issue with a lawyer before you report it. Many lawyers on this site offer free initial consultations, and can advise you on the best way to present the issue to the authorities, and protect any interests you may have that may be implicated...

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